Author Archive

Collaborative Models: Accomplishing More Together

The Hilton Prize Coalition’s Collaborative Models Program leverages the rich base of talent, assets, experience, and insight from its growing membership, as each Coalition member is able to achieve more collectively than it could individually. 

This year, the Coalition launched five new projects that involve nine organizations. These projects include surgical trainings in Rwanda, a study on the wellbeing of aid workers, disaster risk reduction trainings in Myanmar, a needs assessment of communities in Liberia concerning the protection of land rights, and a collaborative storytelling project on the need for equitable access to treatment for non-communicable diseases.

The Coalition is delighted and eager to see the results of each Collaborative Model as well as their future impact.

2018 Collaborative Models Programs

Surgeon Training in Rwanda

Co-Lead Organizations: Operation Smile and Partners in Health

Operation Smile, in partnership with Partners in Health, the University of Rwanda, and the Rwanda Ministries of Health and Education, aims to train surgery residents in Rwanda in order to increase the country’s surgical capacity. This training will prepare residents to deal with current surgical needs in Rwanda, better equipping them to serve the population. The program will also pilot a nutrition intervention program for malnourished patients who otherwise would not be eligible for surgery as well as provide hands on life support training and wound care.

Humanitarian Wellbeing Project

Co-Lead Organizations: Heifer International and The Task Force for Global Health

Recognizing the challenges that international aid workers face, The Task Force for Global Health and Heifer International will conduct research and deliver recommendations to help improve the resilience, emotional health, and psychological wellbeing of aid workers who often experience burnout, depression, and PTSD. These recommendations will aim to improve the lives of aid workers and the quality of aid services delivered.

Disaster Risk Reduction Trainings in Myanmar

Co-Lead Organizations: HelpAge USA and Humanity & Inclusion

Through their partnership, HelpAge USA and Humanity & Inclusion will provide Disaster Risk Reduction trainings to help protect vulnerable groups and train government officials on how to respond during disasters The project focuses on a region of Myanmar that has been prone to climate disasters in the past. The goal of this collaboration is to improve disaster plans and policies for older people and people with disabilities, creating a more inclusive approach to disaster risk reduction.

Landscape Analysis and Collaboration Assessment

Co-Lead Organizations: BRAC and Landesa

Viewing land rights as a critical factor in agricultural productivity, BRAC and Landesa will create a program to assess the landscape of Grand Gedeh, Liberia. The resulting program report will include findings and recommendations on delivery mechanisms for closing the gaps on land rights. It will also include a broader addendum that will feature mutual learnings and challenges faced by BRAC and Landesa throughout the project as well as provide lessons learned to help structure future collaborative projects.

Non-Communicable Diseases Storytelling Project

Co-Lead Organizations: HelpAge USA and PATH

HelpAge USA and PATH will collaborate to address global inequity in access to treatment for non-communicable diseases—inequity which leads to a disproportionate amount of NCD-related deaths in lower to middle income countries. The lack of urgency and understanding that has prevented a stronger response to this issue will be addressed through a storytelling project that will document the realities and challenges of those seeking treatment for NCDs. The storytelling project will include crucial, but often neglected voices, such as the perspectives of older people.

To learn more about the Collaborative Models Program, visit the Collaborative Models page.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

HPC Fellow: Hannelore Van Bavel, Tostan

Hannelore Van Bavel is a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow with Tostan, an international organization that empowers African communities to bring about sustainable development and positive social transformation based on respect for human rights. Hannelore works with Tostan to evaluate the organization’s impact on the practice of female genital cutting. In her blog, she reflects upon this work and upon the dialogue of “victimhood.”

 Hannelore is currently a PhD Candidate in Anthropology and Sociology at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London and a SOAS Research Studentship holder. Her research project focuses on the construction and diffusion of discourses on female genital cutting.

Culture: A Source for Change, Not a Tool of Oppression

By: Hannelore Van Bavel

I became interested in discourses on Africa, and African women in particular, through explorations of gender, race, and colonial thought. I was particularly influenced by the article Under Western Eyes, in which author Chandra Mohanty criticizes how feminist development scholarship often reinforces the idea of women in the Global south as passive victims of culture.

That interest in dialogue on the “victimhood” of women led to research on the concept of agency among minor sex workers in Tanzania for my master’s in Sociology. In Tanzania, I befriended a fellow student who is the co-founder of a civil society organization for his ethnic group, the Maasai. When he heard I was to start a second master’s in Gender and Diversity, he suggested I focus on female genital cutting (FGC).

Hannelore participated in community wellbeing training at the Tostan training Centre with participants from east Africa who work on FGC and/or child marriage in their counties.

I was initially hesitant. FGC seemed to me to be the embodiment of a discourse that I had come to find so problematic: African women oppressed by their culture in need of saving by outsiders. My master’s thesis grappled with questions of how FGC is understood, discussed and approached: it became a critique of how outsider interference, when culturally insensitive and ignorant of the complexities of FGC, can cause a backlash and undermine indigenous efforts to change the practice.

My PhD project allows me to continue exploring the importance of discourses on FGC. Tostan is central to it, because of the important influence Tostan has had and continues to have on the sector’s understanding of female genital mutilation and cutting (FGM/C). I participated in Tostan’s 10-day training on community wellbeing: a unique opportunity to gain insight on Tostan’s work and history. I am very grateful that the Hilton Prize Coalition fellowship now offers me the opportunity to obtain an even deeper understanding of Tostan.

Unlike many other organizations, Tostan does not focus on FGC as a single issue to tackle, but supports wider community empowerment through education. The organization encourages communities to envision their ideal future and believes that they have the capacity to reach their self-defined goals. Rather than coercing communities to give up FGC, they empower communities through education and create opportunities for dialogue about FGC and other issues.

Tostan’s approach thus draws from a very different narrative than the African-women-are-victims discourse: there is no longer a victimized women versus oppressive men binary; culture becomes a source for change rather than a tool of oppression; and communities do not need saving by outsiders because they know best what they want and how to get there.

This approach has been recognized internationally for its effectiveness in ending FGC. My fellowship with Tostan allows me to dive deeper into how Tostan’s effectiveness is measured and what Tostan can teach to the sector.

There is a general lack of quality evaluations for FGC interventions. Two literature reviews of existing FGC program evaluations came up with only 16 studies. Within that general paucity of literature, Tostan does very well, with 25% of the identified quality evaluations being evaluations of Tostan’s program.

Another challenge to the FGC sector is the perception of what constitutes quality when it comes to evaluating FGC programs. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) are often considered the gold standard in the development sector. RCT typically have only one (or a few) outcome variable(s). In the case of measuring the impact of FGC programs, prevalence of FGC would be the logical outcome variable. However, women’s cutting status cannot ethically or practically be observed, and so data are based on self-reporting. It is unclear how reliable self-reporting is. Is an RCT, which is very expensive, the best use of resources?  Particularly when it results in only one (or a few) outcomes, of which the reliability is unclear?

Through 21 years of learning – from communities first, but also from academic research – Tostan has come to a complex understanding of how FGC functions as social norm. Such complexity cannot be captured with a single outcome variable. While Tostan leads in terms of evaluating its program according to the existing gold standards of program evaluation, I believe it has an ever bigger leadership role to play in challenging how change related to FGC can be captured. Tostan has been working on exciting approaches based on social norm theory. Central to this approach is a thorough understanding of the societies, in which Tostan is active, feedback from the people who participate in the program, and a deep respect for participating communities. I believe that the FGC sector and the wider development sector have a lot to gain by replacing positivistic evaluation methods, which believe that the social is objective and measurable, by more constructivist methods that acknowledge the importance of context and the centrality of humans as change makers.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

HPC Fellow: Izehi Oriaghan, Landesa

Izehi Oriaghan is a current Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow with Landesa, a nonprofit organization that partners with governments and local organizations to secure legal land rights for the world’s poorest families. In her blog, Izehi reflects upon land rights in Nigeria.

A Quick Look at Women’s Land and Inheritance Rights in Nigeria
by Izehi Oriaghan

In my academic and professional experience, I have been confronted with women’s issues, including child or early marriage, the limited participation of women in business and political leadership, and gender-based violence. But until this summer, I had never really contemplated the status of the Nigerian woman in regards to her right to own or inherit land.

Working with Landesa this summer as a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow has been a great learning opportunity for me. I have been able to explore an aspect of international development and women’s empowerment that, before now, I had not given much thought. And I am grateful for this experience. In my role, I conducted background research to support Landesa’s emerging global women’s land rights (WLR) campaign, which seeks to bridge the implementation gap between law and practice in fostering WLR globally. This work has led me to take a closer look at the WLR landscape in Nigeria.

Land acquisition for men and women in Nigeria, for the most part, is through inheritance. And inheritance right to a great extent is influenced by the customs in different parts of the country. Most often, men have a greater chance of inheriting land over women, and sadly this patrilineal system of land inheritance still continues to date despite the provisions of the law. Hence, there is a huge gender gap in land ownership in Nigeria, and less than 2% of women, compared to 17% men, own land by themselves ( Brunelli, De La O Campos, Doss, & Slavchevska, 2016a).

Landesa: http://www.landesa.org/wp-content/uploads/infographic-womens-land-rights.jpg

The 1978 Land Use Act of Nigeria established a state-owned land system that allowed similar opportunities for men and women to acquire or inherit land (Brunelli et al., 2016a). However, only legally married women could benefit from this act, so it did not necessarily improve the ownership or inheritance rights for women in Nigeria. Transfer of land ownership is still largely guided by customary practices that discriminate against women, especially because the average citizen has poor knowledge of the statutory laws with respect to land( Brunelli, De La O Campos, Doss, & Slavchevska, 2016b).

Based on my own personal inquiries on the subject and published research, I have found that few land owners in Nigeria have the formal documents to prove land ownership. This is why statutory laws, in comparison to customary practices, are not always as effective in ensuring secure and equitable land tenure for women and men because the legal ownership of many such lands cannot be proven. The customary system in Nigeria is quite flexible and approves the right to transfer land without seeking government approval. Consequently, up to 40% of land in Nigeria may be prone to legal disputes over rightful ownership, which means a large portion of land in Nigeria is under insecure tenure (Brunelli et al., 2016b).

In comparing women’s inheritance rights outcomes in customary and statutory settings, I decided to sample the opinions of women from different parts of the country. I wanted to know the typical Nigerian woman’s experience in spite of the law.

Shade Pedro is from the western part of Nigeria. According to her, it is not culturally common for girls or women to inherit land from their parents, except in rare cases when there is no male offspring. Even these rare cases largely depend on the level of exposure or belief of the family elders. It is possible that a woman can inherit her husband’s land if she is legally married to him, but she runs a risk of losing such rights if she bares no children. Shade is from one of such enlightened families, and she is able to inherit her father’s land as the first daughter of the family. This is not always the case.

Unlike Shade, Stella Isimen is unable to inherit her father’s property even being the first child of the family, and this is the plight of many girls and women in the southern part of Nigeria. As a legally married woman already past retirement age, she has no land or title to her name, and her children will inherit her husband’s property, not her.

Uche Precious is from the eastern part of Nigeria and shares a similar experience with Stella. A girl child cannot inherit her father’s land if she has male siblings. If widowed and without a male child, her husband’s land or property goes to his male siblings. If she bares male children, the inheritance rights fall to them. In essence, a girl or woman from the east does not have any particular inheritance rights.

The scenario is equally worse to the north of the country where women, for customary and religious reasons, often relinquish their inheritance rights due to social pressures.

I must mention that one thing is common for all these experiences, and it is the fact that these women all alluded to some improvement in customary practices due to increasing literacy and awareness of gender equality. Thus, I might conclude that an intervention especially for knowledge and capacity development for local citizens, provision of formal land titles, a review of inheritance and land laws, and improved implementation systems will go a long way to improve the land rights of women in Nigeria.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.


References

Brunelli, C., De la O Campos, A.,  Doss, C., & Slavchevska, V.(2016a, December). Beyond Ownership: Tracking Progress on Women’s Land Rights in Sub-Saharan Africa (Working paper No. 15). Retrieved http://gsars.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/WP-14.12.2016-Beyond-Ownership.pdf

Brunelli, C., De la O Campos, A.,  Doss, C., & Slavchevska, V. (2016b). Beyond Ownership: Women’s and Men’s Land Rights in Sub-Saharan Africa (Rep.). Retrieved from http://pubdocs.worldbank.org/en/170131495654694482/A2-ABCA-Slavcheska-et-al-2016-Beyond-ownership-working-paper.pdf

Coalition Member Spotlight: St Christopher’s Hospice

The Hilton Prize Coalition shines a spotlight on Laureate member St Christopher’s HospiceSt Christopher’s was the world’s first modern hospice established by Dame Cicely Saunders in 1967, transforming care for the dying around the world. In 2001, St Christopher’s was awarded the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize for the work originated by Dame Cicely through the hospice. Now, over 50 years later, the world still looks to St Christopher’s for advice, support, and ideas in how best to care for people through serious illness, death, and bereavement.

St Christopher’s has experience supporting people at some of the most difficult and frightening times in their lives and, in the last year alone, provided that support to over 6,500 across the diverse communities of south east London. Striving to have the resources to reach everyone who needs them, St Christopher’s needed an innovative solution to make quality end of life care available to all.

The new Learning Hub will equip and empower members of the public to support their loved ones at home. 

For St Christopher’s, education is the answer. Based on their model, good education underpins good care. In the last year, St Christopher’s provided training to over 7,000 people from 45 different countries; working with them to develop and improve care for those living with life-changing conditions and their families wherever they are in the world. Their Education Centre is the world’s first specializing in palliative care; however, their current facilities are outdated, inflexible, and without the technology needed to help them connect effectively with people who want to learn remotely.

That’s why, to mark their 50th anniversary, St Christopher’s embarked on a campaign to build a new, world-class education center known as The Learning Hub. This Hub will support St Christopher’s in realizing their vision of a world in which all dying people and those close to them have access to the care and support they need—when and wherever they need it.

St Christopher’s has the skills to equip and empower members of the public to care for their loved ones. End of life care is not restricted to professionals anymore. St Christopher’s believes that it’s essential to provide support to the general public, patients, families, and carers if they are to effect real change for dying people and their families across the world.As well as increasing the number of people they train, the Hub will also enable St Christopher’s to pioneer new ways of teaching. Many people want to play a part in caring for someone they love at the end of life but often lack the confidence or skills required to do so. One wife of a patient supported by St Christopher’s outlined the critical nature of this need: “We had never nursed anyone before, let alone a terminally ill person, and we really struggled to cope with some of the most basic, simple caring tasks. One day we saw a nurse at St Christopher’s do this so beautifully and we wept because we wanted to do it that beautifully and didn’t know how. We realised with a few basic nursing skills we could have done a much better job and, perhaps, kept him at home much longer.”

An artist’s impression of the Learning Hub

The Learning Hub is just one of the ways St Christopher’s will ensure generations to come will have the benefit of the care at St Christopher’s. On Friday, June 22, which would have been their founder, Dame Cicely Saunders, 100th birthday, St Christopher’s was proud  to see the first spade enter the ground and building work on the Learning Hub begin.

Works are expected to take 18 months to complete. To find out more about the Learning Hub visit St Christopher’s website.

(Photos courtesy of St Christopher’s Hospice)

About The Hilton Prize Coalition
The Hilton Prize Coalition is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the Fellows Program, the Collaborative Models Program and the Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

 

HPC Fellow: Vida Garcia, Global Impact

Vida Garcia is a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow based at Global Impact, the Secretariat of the Hilton Prize Coalition. During her fellowship, she had the opportunity to engage in event planning, data analysis, and communication projects. Here are some of her reflections on leadership and her experiences at Global Impact.

Helping through Leadership
By Vida Garcia

woman speaking at podium

Vida speaking at a United States Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) naturalization ceremony.

In his 45 years of life, my father has touched many lives: friends, neighbors, former drug addicts, refugees, and my own. He has the innate ability to build long-lasting relationships; he is a paradigm of service. To my father, service is more than what you do, it is defined by who you are. From a very young age, I have aspired to affect people in the manner that my dad does, but my vision has expanded beyond my immediate neighbors. I decided to study International Relations and Political Science, so that I can better understand global affairs and, through the use of diplomacy, help solve future conflict in the world. Like my dad, I want to be a leader who inspires people and brings them together to help those in need.

There are many theories of leadership. For example, some people believe that leaders are born, not made, but in my experience the opposite is also true. Sometimes life takes you on a rollercoaster of adventures that end up shaping who you are and who you are going to become. My dad always says that everyone’s rollercoaster is different. In the end, it is up to you to either let those experiences dishearten and crush you or strengthen your character to help you grow. He says that people will try to tell you who you are based on where you’ve been, but that just means you’ll have to work a little harder to show them “no, this is who I am.” If you’ve risen from adversity by overcoming the obstacles that have come your way, people will eventually see the strength within you.

One thing everyone seems to agree on is that the most effective leaders are those who lead by example, whether by setting an example themselves or by following the examples of those who came before them. In my experience, some qualities that effective leaders have in common are being consistent in their work, setting up realistic and concrete goals for their teams, providing clear direction and context, and being effective mentors.

Something that is often overlooked is that effective leaders are able to inspire. From my dad, I’ve learned that true leaders make people want to follow them based on their character, morality, or work ethic. Throughout my fellowship with Global Impact, the Hilton Prize Coalition’s Secretariat, I’ve been surrounded by leaders that do just that. I’ve noticed that they find passion in their work and in turn project this passion through their leadership styles, and this has been one of the most valuable lessons I’ve learned. By following their lead, I am developing the skills necessary to become a leader who inspires others.

Based at the Secretariat, Global Impact, I have had the unique opportunity to immerse myself in each Laureate organization and its mission. Supporting the Hilton Prize Coalition Fellowship and Storytelling Programs, I have gained skills in event planning, data collection and analysis, as well as communications. My primary work for the Fellowship Program is to plan a summit where three cohorts of Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows can convene to catch up, share lessons learned, and deepen their connections. The summit will allow Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows to strengthen their network of like-minded peers as they begin to advance through their careers in the humanitarian sector.

The Fellows network provides future humanitarian leaders with a network of support to lean on and glean ideas from as they do the hard work of international development. Through planning this summit, I’m doing what I’ve always wanted to do. I’m bringing people together to help those in need. A common piece of advice I’ve heard as a student is to find my passion and follow it. I’ve been lucky enough to have found my passion early on through my dad. Now, I’m able to pursue a career that complements it. Knowing why your work matters and that you are making an impact in people’s lives around the world is one of the most fulfilling parts of working with the Hilton Prize Coalition.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Coalition Member Spotlight: International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims

In recognition of International Day in Support of Victims of Torture, June 26, The Hilton Prize Coalition shines a spotlight on the International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims (IRCT).  Advocating for the right to rehabilitation of torture victims everywhere, IRCT’s initiatives help victims rebuild their lives after torture and provide a system of support for survivors.

Established in 1985 in response to the constant use of torture by both states and non-state actors around the world, the International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims (IRCT) vocalizes the rights of hundreds of thousands of torture victims. IRCT was awarded the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize in 2003 for their commitment to provide quality rehabilitation services that include medical, psychological, legal and social support.

man holding caneTorture leaves severe scars on the victim and can impact future generations due to lasting physical and psychological damage. Self-isolation and anxiety are common symptoms among many torture survivors. Depression, insomnia, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are also some of the cognitive conditions that affect victims of torture. Even though these conditions take a special toll on the entire family, in particular, children are most vulnerable to the after-effects of torture.

Through its Global Anti-Torture Evidence project, IRCT aims to further the global fight against torture. Using data collected throughout the rehabilitation process, IRCT strives to prevent torture, help victims rebuild their lives, and prosecute perpetrators. For this purpose, the IRCT relies on its innovative Anti-Torture Database (ATD), which is used in 43 member centers across 35 countries. These centers not only provide rehabilitation support to torture survivors, but they also pool together a larger quantity and quality of data to support strategic national, regional, and international advocacy in order to eradicate torture.

A younger program within IRCT is the Global Indicators Initiative. Launched in February of this year, the initiative seeks to develop national indicators on torture victims’ rights to rehabilitation. With workshops in Uganda and South Africa, this project seeks to enable members of IRCT to better guide their states and measure the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs. Ultimately, these indicators will become a tool used to inform governments and lead to more efficient ways to support torture survivors in rebuilding their lives.

Samuel Nsubuga, the Chief Executive Officer of IRCT member ACTV, provided commentary on how a national indicator system could improve support to torture victims in Uganda: “We have excellent laws that promise support to torture victims but in practice, the State does very little to make these promises reality. So, what we need is a framework for assessing these efforts that has the buy-in of both State agencies and civil society. Then, we can truly start to move forward on this important issue.”

IRCT and ACTV are currently working alongside national stakeholders to finalize the national indicator framework for human rights monitoring work. To learn more visit IRCT.

(Photos courtesy of IRCT)

About The Hilton Prize Coalition
The Hilton Prize Coalition is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the Fellows Program, the Collaborative Models Program and the Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

 

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