Mental Health Awareness Month: Clubhouse International Fellows Make a Difference

May is Mental Health Awareness Month. To commemorate the month, Hilton Prize Coalition is celebrating the restorative power of Clubhouse International, an organization whose vision is to create a world where people with mental illness recover and are an integral part of society.

To further Clubhouse International’s vision and mission, the Hilton Prize Coalition has provided resources to staff two Fellows placements. Here are the Fellows who made an impact at Clubhouse International and beyond.

Learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows Program and all our Fellows do.

Fellows Snapshots

Oyuntugs Bayaraa

During her time at Clubhouse International, Oyuntugs completed an intensive New Clubhouse Development training and developed an action plan designed to start a Clubhouse in Mongolia.

Patient Kwizera

Patient completed trainings with Clubhouse International to work towards developing a Clubhouse in Rwanda. Find out more about his background here.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through its signature Fellows Program, the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact. 

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit 
prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

How to Get the Most Out of A Fellowship Experience

The Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows Program seeks to develop a robust pipeline of leaders who possess not only subject matter skills and expertise, but also the soft leadership skills needed to succeed in the workplace, and who understand and value the importance of collaboration for humanitarian and development organizations to increase effectiveness throughout the sector. 

To accomplish this aim, the Hilton Prize Coalition offers a high level of professional support and engagement for each Fellow throughout their placements across the globe. In addition to receiving support from the Hilton Prize Coalition’s Fellows Coordinator, Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows work alongside some of the most prestigious NGOs in the world.  

Below are three ways that Fellows can make the most of this professional support during their time as a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow. 

1. Write an impactful blog

Every Fellow writes a blog. These blogs are typically a reflection on the Fellow’s experience within the fellowship. Some Fellows choose to highlight their whole experience while others focus in on one particular experience or theme.  

Regardless of the approach, these blogs are an avenue for Fellows to promote their work, demonstrate their expertise, and flag to the humanitarian sector that they are a burgeoning leader.  

Outside of the Hilton Prize Coalition, these blogs can serve to advance a Fellow’s personal brand as they embark on career endeavors post-fellowship. Fellows can share the published piece on LinkedIn or even incorporate it into a portfolio. 

2. Use the Fellows Coordinator as a resource

Throughout an entire engagement with the Hilton Prize Coalition, a Fellow gets three standard check-ins with the Fellows Coordinator: an introductory call, a mid-point check-in, and an exit call. 

Outside of those structured conversations on progress, growth, and lessons learned, the Fellows Coordinator is available for more inquiries and chats with the cohort and alumni network along the way. If a Fellow is interested in connecting with another Laureate organization, the Fellows Coordinator can help! Or if a Fellow wants to connect with another peer in the alumni network, the Fellows Coordinator can help with that too! 

Think of the Fellow Coordinator as a connector and community builder. The Fellows Coordinator is here to ensure every Fellow leaves with more resources to succeed than they came to the fellowship with. 

3. Connect to your cohort and alumni network

Even though the Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows are spread across the globe, bridging community is still an emphasis. Cultivating this community happens two ways: digitally and in-person.

Events are one way the Hilton Prize Coalition keeps the Fellows community thriving. Online and in-person fellowship events are convened on an ad hoc basis throughout the year, and Fellows are encouraged to take advantage of these opportunities to network and learn from each other.

There is also the Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows & Alumni LinkedIn group. Fellows and alumni are encouraged to connect with each other on this platform to share career updates and thought leadership ideas. 

The Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows alumni network will remain a part of a Fellow’s professional network for the remainder of their career. So, take advantage of these built in connections!

Other ideas on how to grow in the humanitarian sector? Email prizecoalition@charity.org

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through its signature Fellows Program, the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact. 

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit 
prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Addressing Burnout among Humanitarian Workers: Investing in Staff on the Ground and in the Office

The Hilton Prize Coalition’s Collaborative Models Program leverages the rich base of talent, assets, experience, and insight from its growing membership, as each Coalition member is able to achieve more collectively than it could individually. This blog recaps the partnership between The Task Force for Global Health and Heifer International.

In the spring of 2018, The Task Force for Global Health and Heifer International teamed up under the Collaborative Models Program to conduct the Hilton Prize Coalition Wellbeing Project. The overall purpose of the project was to 1) better understand staff stress and burnout across Hilton Prize Coalition members; 2) identify policies and approaches currently used by Hilton Prize Coalition members to provide staff support; and 3) identify opportunities for Hilton Prize Coalition members to improve employee resilience and psychological health. In April 2019, the project leaders held a webinar for Hilton Prize Coalition members to discuss the project’s report, entitled The Hilton Prize Coalition Wellbeing Project: Staff Wellbeing and Sustainable Engagement in Humanitarian Organizations. This interactive session was an opportunity to share collective learnings in the hopes of improving awareness around the issue and to discuss best practices.

The Hilton Prize Coalition Wellbeing Project had its origins in a growing awareness of the stresses inherent in humanitarian work that can lead to burnout, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. In addition to affecting individual humanitarian workers, these factors can limit the effectiveness of humanitarian organizations in their efforts to alleviate suffering and provide support to communities.

“The fields of humanitarian aid, development, and global health attract highly motivated people who care deeply about the world,” explained David Addiss, MD, Director of the Focus Area for Compassion and Ethics at the Task Force for Global Health and one of the report’s authors. “This sense of calling sometimes leads to overwork, over-identification with work, and burnout, which has negative consequences both for individuals and organizations. Hilton Humanitarian Prize Laureates represent an elite group, whose commitment to employee wellbeing can influence the humanitarian world as a whole.”

To produce this report, The Task Force for Global Health and Heifer International interviewed nearly 40 representatives from Coalition member organizations to collect data. Interviews were completed with 10 CEOs or their designees, 10 HR Directors or their designees, and 19 staff. Additionally, HR Directors or their designees were invited to complete an online survey about their organization’s policies for employee support; completed surveys were received from 14 organizations.

The small sample size of the study limited the ability to generalize these findings to all Hilton Prize Coalition members or to humanitarian organizations in general. However, top-level findings revealed that while burnout is felt across Coalition member organizations, it takes on different forms and affects distinct groups differently. Some of the major takeaways are as follows:

  • Among Hilton Prize laureate organizations, stress is ubiquitous, burnout is not uncommon, and resources for staff wellbeing are often inadequate.
  • At the individual level, types of stressors differ by gender; they also differ between headquarters and “field” staff and between national and expatriate humanitarian workers.
  • Key stressors can be grouped into two broad categories.
    • First are “structural dynamics” that contribute to burnout; these include factors internal to the organization, such as workload, communication pathways, management, supervision, and team cohesion and external factors such as short-term funding cycles, audits, and pressure from funders for performance.
    • Second are stressors around “safety,” which include both physical security (e.g., transportation, travel, threat of violence) and psychological safety (e.g., trusting relationships, civility) stressors.
  • Findings from surveys and interviews with leaders and staff indicate that burnout is an important challenge for employees of Coalition organizations. While some of the major stressors resulted from the difficult working conditions, such as witnessing suffering, organizational factors were also cited as contributing to burnout, including ambiguous job roles, long and unpredictable working hours, perceived barriers to professional growth, and poor relationships with supervisors or other organizational leaders.

Through this report, The Task Force for Global Health and Heifer International’s findings provided a baseline assessment and pointed to exemplary practices to foster wellbeing in several Coalition member organizations.

Thank you to both organizations for such an impactful and informative webinar! The full report can be found in the Hilton Prize Coalition Resource Center.

A Mutual Learning Approach to Fellowships

Andrea Varrella , Legal Officer at ECPAT International, talks about her experience as a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows Supervisor. Read her reflection to learn how ECPAT staff place value on learning just as much from their Fellows as the Fellows learn from them.

As a recipient of the Hilton Humanitarian Prize, ECPAT International has been privileged to be involved in the Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows Program for the past two years, and I have had the great opportunity to be the supervisor of four of the seven Fellows that have joined us at ECPAT.

As a young professional myself, who knows the challenges in starting out in a competitive but rewarding career in international development and children’s rights, I see the Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows Program as a fantastic initiative that not only creates opportunities for those early in their career but also generates meaningful benefits for the Hilton Prize Coalition host organizations.  

At ECPAT International we coordinate research, advocacy, and action to end the sexual exploitation of children in all its manifestations. While this is a challenging topic, we believe it attracts passionate and dedicated people. The Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows Program provides the perfect opportunity for ECPAT International to find those passionate people, contribute to the professional development of a new generation of talent, and support our mandate to end the sexual exploitation of children.

As equal and valued members of the team, each Fellow takes on a crucial role in supporting ECPAT’s work such as producing cutting-edge research and supporting ECPAT’s diverse network of members and partners in 96 countries. Previous Fellows have produced a number of research reports on the sexual exploitation of children in specific countries. Each Fellow owned the entire process from drafting the report and liaising with local organizations to collecting data and actively supporting the publication and media launch of the final reports.

As a network with members all over the world, ECPAT is a unique international NGO through which Fellows are exposed to the complexities and nuances of our work. Fellows have the opportunity to take a peek at the challenges that organizations and professionals working in our field have to face every day.

Fellows also get to work directly alongside a cross-cultural team—many of whom who have worked in the industry for years, or some who come from different sectors and bring a wealth of valuable knowledge. Similarly, our Fellows have come from all over the world. We have hosted Fellows from South Korea, India, Brazil, France, Italy, UK, and Germany. These Fellows brought a range of expertise and qualifications, including but not limited to human rights law, communications, and project management.

Supervisors and colleagues at ECPAT are always proud to see Fellows leave ECPAT as effective problems solvers with specialized skills who have gone on to work with local organizations and UN agencies.

Besides their valuable contributions, our Fellows are a breath of fresh air in our office, bringing energy and enthusiasm and a range of new insights and perspectives to our work. This is greatly appreciated and needed for tackling some of the complex problems that ECPAT works to address. I do believe we are in fact learning as much from the Fellows as they are from us. As we work to empower children and defend their rights, we also believe in maximizing the potential of our young people to build an even more passionate, knowledgeable, and effective generation of development professionals.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through its signature Fellows Program, the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact. 

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit 
prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Leading Thoughts: Shaun O’Leary and Heather Richardson, St Christopher’s Hospice

This spring the Hilton Prize Coalition is resurfacing the Leading Thoughts series, which reflects upon the work being conducted by Coalition members to build resilience in communities across the world. This clip from 2018 features Shaun O’Leary and Heather Richardson, Joint Chief Executives of St Christopher’s Hospice.

In the clip, Shaun and Heather describe one of the gifts of the hospice movement: recognizing that you must attend as much to the family as you must to the person who’s dying. That’s why St Christopher’s seeks to promote and provide skilled and compassionate palliative care of the highest quality.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through its signature Fellows Program, the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact. 

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit 
prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.



Leading Thoughts: Chris Jochnick, Landesa

This spring the Hilton Prize Coalition is resurfacing the Leading Thoughts series, which reflects upon the work being conducted by Coalition members to build resilience in communities across the world. This clip from 2018 features Chris Jochnick, President & CEO, Landesa. In it, Chris describes appreciating land in a holistic way because land rights go beyond property grabs and conflicts. So many of the world’s poor struggle because of insecure land titles. That’s why Landesa seeks to alleviate the pervasive drag on small-holder farmers.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through its signature Fellows Program, the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact. 

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit 
prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Fighting Lymphatic Filariasis: HPC Fellow Lynette Suiaunoa-Scanlan

Lynette Suiaunoa-Scanlan is a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow working with The Task Force for Global Health. At The Task Force, Lynette worked on a community-based post Lymphatic Filariasis mass drug administration Coverage Survey in American Samoa. Read on to learn about her time as a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow.

I first learned about Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows Program from a colleague who recommended me to the Task Force for Global Health. Instinctively, I applied without knowing what the position fully entailed. I was a recent MPH graduate who deeply desired an opportunity to exercise my newly acquired knowledge and set of skills. Upon receiving the great news, I humbly accepted the opportunity and immediately got involved. I was thrilled to be a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow in American Samoa “my home” after being away for so many years.

As a Fellow, I was assigned to assist the US Centers for Disease Control’s Center for Global Health (CDCCGH) and the Pacific Island Health Officers Association (PIHOA) to conduct a community-based post Lymphatic Filariasis mass drug administration (LF MDA) Coverage Survey in American Samoa. This coverage survey is a component of American Samoa Department of Health’s (ASDOH) Lymphatic Filariasis Prevention and Elimination Program, and in adherence to the World Health Organization’s Global Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis (LF) Strategy.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), American Samoa is the only area in the United States where LF is endemic. Surveys for LF conducted in 1999 demonstrated that American Samoa had some of the highest infection levels in the Pacific Region (Coutts et al., 2017). Despite the efforts to control and eliminate the disease from 2000-2015, results from a survey conducted in 2016 indicated widespread transmission across the territory (Sheel et al., 2018). There are recent actions to accomplish elimination and there is evidence that early treatment can reverse clinical impact. And because of this the government of American Samoa strengthened an obligation to eliminate LF in American Samoa by 2024.

During the coverage survey, I assisted as a supervisor/consultant for one of three teams. The survey consisted of 3 full days of training and 13 full days of field work.The field work was my favorite part of the fellowship. We went out to the randomly selected villages and utilized coverage survey sampling to identify households for inclusion in coverage interviews. The interviews were implemented primarily by asking consent approval, if yes, a brief questionnaire about the LF campaign and MDA would follow.

The team also stumbled upon challenges. Some challenges we had no control over such as the weather, this would often push us back. With perseverance and a deadline to meet the challenges and barriers in the end, transparency mended. Nonetheless, it was heartwarming to see the efforts of the collaboration of the American Samoa Department of Health, CDC and PIHOA flourish through the knowledge the citizens knew about lymphatic filariasis. This gave an optimistic sense of direction (at least for me) for the future endeavor of eliminating this silent parasitic disease.    

Although it was a time sensitive project and eventually came to an end, I was most enthusiastic about the opportunity to be a part of something meaningful that cultivated the general health of the people of American Samoa. As little or big as my role was, I was able to genuinely contribute my time and knowledge to work towards the continuous efforts to eliminate LF in American Samoa. My experience as a Fellow was very rewarding. I was given an opportunity to work with a wonderful team, and I’m forever grateful for the mentorship throughout the project.

Special thank you to the Task Force for Global Health and Hilton Prize Coalition for the once in a lifetime opportunity. This opportunity in it’s short time opened new doors for me to continue working in a field that I am passionate about.

(Photos courtesy of The Task Force for Global Health. Image features TFGH team that  traveled to Tau, Manu’a during the coverage survey)

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through its signature Fellows Program, the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact. 

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit
prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.


World Health Day: PATH Fellows Make a Difference

April 7 is World Health Day, a global health awareness day celebrated under the sponsorship of the World Health Organization. To commemorate World Health Day, we recognize all that PATH has done to improve the health of people around the world by advancing technologies, strengthening systems, and encouraging healthy behaviors.

To further PATH’s mission, the Hilton Prize Coalition has provided resources to staff four Fellows placements. Here are the Fellows who have made an impact at PATH and beyond.

Learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows Program and all our Fellows do.

FELLOWS SNAPSHOTS

Nikhila (Nikki) Kalra

Nikki worked on PATH’s Nutrition Innovation team. Blockchain and Digital Currency Fellow. She conducted field research into food value chains in support of maternal and child nutrition programs in Ghana and Senegal .

Chytanya Kompala

On the Nutrition Innovation team at PATH, Chytanya conducted a systematic review on the determinants of stunting. She also wrote policy briefs on nutrition-sensitive risk factors of stunting.

Catherine May

Also serving on the Nutrition Innovation team at PATH, Catherine advanced a PATH collaboration with Heifer International to leverage the collective knowledge of both organizations into more effective interventions in food systems and human health.

Amy Roll

Amy works with PATH’s Nutrition Innovation Team on data-driven reports on cookstoves. She also supported PATH, The Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves, and The Bridge Collaborative in bringing together expertise across the health, environment, and development disciplines to develop recommendations for clean fuel and improved cookstove research and programs.

About the Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Taking a Stand to End Human Trafficking: HPC Fellow Alma Vazquez

Alma Vazquez is a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow working with Covenant House. At Covenant House, Alma advocated for survivors of human trafficking. In her blog, she reflects upon the impact of advocacy work.

In my time as a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow with Covenant House, my experience has been life changing. I’ve been able to learn and help many to understand the true reality of human trafficking. Many are blind to the idea that human trafficking is an escalating and very serious issue. It’s an issue that’s happening right under their noses.

By educating people about what human trafficking really is and ways to prevent it, it opens up one’s mind to really look out for red flags and ultimately try to make some sort of change on this continuing reality.

Red flags to look out for include:

  • Seeing a young female with an older guy
  • Seeing young girls on the block trying to prostitute themselves
  • Seeing young women frequently monitored and not in control of their own money, financial records, or bank account

The list goes on and on.

The reality is that many girls are too afraid to speak out because they feel nobody will believe them. Many girls fear they will be judged. They fear that someone will say they are just seeking attention. Because of these reasons, advocating for girls who are survivors of human trafficking really made me change the way I see and interpret this world. I knew that all it took was one voice. One voice that could potentially save the life of another young woman or man.

We also have to keep in mind that men can get lured into human trafficking. When a survivor speaks up about their experience and what they had to go through, it is no easy task. Male victims of human trafficking face an additional stigma.

Over the course of this fellowship, I learned that being an advocate for survivors helps create a cycle for many young girls to be able to open up about their experiences. By opening up, they are able to bring change into the way society views human trafficking.

During my fellowship, I had the opportunity to attend many Anti-Human Trafficking Coalition meetings. From attending these meetings, I learned that there is a full community working on bettering and bringing safety to many girls that have experienced human trafficking. Being part of their team has really been an amazing experience, and I have learned so much from attending meetings and meeting very important people from many different organizations such as Safe Horizon, Restore, Sanctuary for Families and so many more.

Knowing that I am able to have a voice for many of these girls really warms my heart because as a survivor I know what it feels like to think that nobody out there cares. Overall, when a survivor feels like someone does care and wants a better life for them, it ultimately changes their perspective of life and it gives them a sense of wanting a better future for themselves.

I will continue to work and be a part of the many opportunities provided to end human trafficking.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

World Water Day: Amref Health Africa’s Impact

March 22 marks World Water Day, a day that highlights the importance of freshwater. This United Nations observance day is used to advocate for the sustainable management of freshwater resources, and the 2019 theme is leaving no one behind. To achieve Sustainable Development Goal 6, every country needs to ensure the availability and sustainable management of water for all by 2030.

Amref Health Africa is one Hilton Prize Coalition member who understands the importance of access to clean water within its strategic pillars. Amref’s mission is to increase sustainable health access to communities in Africa through solutions in human resources for health, health services delivery, and investments in health.

For World Water Day, Amref shared the story of Bandacho Primary in Kenya.

“Where hope should have died, Amref keeps the embers glowing. Where thirsty children fantasize about a drink of fresh water – something so basic, we just do not stand by and watch them suffer.”

Go to Amref’s blog to get the full story on how Amref Health Africa ensures children have more than 300ml of water to drink per day at school.

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