International Women’s Day: Women for Women International’s Fellows Make a Difference

March 8 was Internal Women’s Day, a day of recognizing women for their achievements without regard to divisions, whether national, ethnic, linguistic, cultural, economic or political.

To commemorate International Women’s Day, we recognize all that Women for Women International has done to advance social and economic empowerment for women. Women for Women International supports the most marginalized women in countries affected by conflict and war. Their programs enable women to earn and save money, improve health and well-being, influence decisions in their home and community, and connect to networks for support. By utilizing skills, knowledge, and resources, women are able to create sustainable change for themselves, their family, and community.

To further Women for Women’s mission, the Hilton Prize Coalition has provided resources to staff two Fellows placements. Here are the Fellows who have made an impact at Women for Women International and beyond.

Learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows Program and all our Fellows do.

FELLOWS SNAPSHOTS

Desiree Dickerson

Desiree served as Women for Women International’s Blockchain and Digital Currency Fellow. She explored how blockchain and distributed ledger technology, as well as other emerging technologies, could aid Women for Women International in its mission to empower women in marginalized countries affected by war and conflict.

Rounida Shwaish

Rounida worked with the organization’s Human Resources department to conduct research related to capacity building and learning management systems. At the start of her fellowship, she traveled to the Women for Women office in Kosovo to participate in organization’s global HR retreat during which she presented on implementing a learning management system.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

(Photos courtesy of Women for Women International)



Compassionate Care: HPC Fellow Maria Colimão

Maria Colimão is a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow working with St Christopher’s Hospice. At St Christopher’s Hospice, Maria worked closely with the Compassionate Neighbours program on outreach, home visits, and trainings for the community on compassionate care. In her blog, Maria reflects upon her time at St Christopher’s Hospice.

Compassionate Neighbours are a growing network of people who support each other to promote compassion in their communities. They provide social and emotional support to people around them living with or caring for someone with a life limiting illness or those experiencing loneliness or social isolation by visiting regularly, offering friendship, emotional support and a listening ear; helping people continue doing things they love; helping people stay connected to the community, family and friends.

To make this network spread, I’ve worked with three dimensions of the program: outreach, home and matching visits, and training.

1. Outreach

In the outreach dimension, I had the opportunity to engage with organizations in London’s Croydon community. On December 4, 2018, I engaged with a group of 45 Muslim women in Elmwood, a community within Croydon. I presented the Compassionate Neighbours project and offered them the opportunity to join our network.

On January 5, 2019 through a connection with Norbury Green Residents Association, we had the chance to link with the local Counselor Shafi Khan. We shared our Compassionate Neighbours program and ran the event alongside another St Christopher’s Hospice project called Creative Conversations.

After the event, the Norbury Green Residents Association advertised our project in their newsletter, and a national organization contacted us to know more about the project. They were willing to join. This moment taught me the power of collaboration.

2. Home and Matching Visits

The home and matching visits have been my main focus since January and it’s an amazing opportunity and privilege to meet and connect with amazing people.

Through this experience, I’ve learned that the world is so small. In February, I matched two ladies who already knew each other. Once, they both were caring for their husbands and attended a carer support group.  They only realized that connection when they saw each other after I matched them. Our aim is to connect local people, so it’s a big win when that goal is achieved!

3. Trainings

The trainings are an opportunity to know more interesting people and have an idea of how to match them. It’s an educational part of the project that I love especially as we talk about death and dying. For some people, this is the first time they start to build the awareness concerning these issues.

As my time at St Christopher’s Hospice as a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow comes to a close, I am thankful for all of the connections I have been able to make for myself and the community around me.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

(Photos courtesy St Christopher’s Hospice)

World Day of Social Justice: BRAC Fellows Make a Difference

February 20 is World Day of Social Justice. Social justice is necessary for all communities to have equal access to peace and opportunity. Social justice seeks to remove barriers that people face because of gender, age, race, ethnicity, religion, culture or disability.

For World Day of Social Justice, we recognize all that Hilton Prize Coalition member BRAC has done to advance social justice. Since 1972, BRAC has improved lives around the world by empowering communities to better utilize their human and material resources to lift themselves out of poverty. Founded in a remote village in Bangladesh, BRAC has grown into one of the largest development organizations in the world.

To further BRAC’s mission, the Hilton Prize Coalition has provided resources to staff four Fellows placements at BRAC. The Fellows’ projects ranged from digital marketing campaigns to new revenue generating strategies. Here are the Fellows who have made an impact at BRAC and beyond.

Learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows Program and all our Fellows do.

FELLOWS SNAPSHOTS

Sarah Allen

Sarah supported BRAC USA’s work to create opportunities for people around the world by raising awareness and mobilizing resources to support its programs. Working on both the Communications and Business Development teams, Sarah played a joint role and completed projects that ranged from developing social media content and writing press releases to conducting prospect research on potential funders and supporting relationship management with institutional donors.

But throughout all of these varied projects, Sarah’s time at BRAC USA was marked by the Rohingya humanitarian crisis. It’s something that permeated every day, whether she was identifying prospective donors to support response efforts, conducting digital marketing campaigns to raise awareness about the crisis, or reporting to donors on the latest updates from the field.

Hrithik Bansal

Hrithik worked with the senior leadership of BRAC USA to develop and implement strategies towards new revenue-generating activities. To help Bangladeshi citizens solve land-related issues, the BRAC Human Rights and Legal Services program had initiated a land service enterprise, complementing its existing work in this arena advocating for the poor and underserved.

For Hrithik, finding a business case that balanced the social aspects of the enterprise against the financial viability of the firm was deeply enriching, and one that leveraged his unique skill set and experience.

Mia Perez

At BRAC USA, Mia worked on BRAC’s Play Lab project and the Learning, Empowerment, and Adolescent Development (LEAD) team in support of BRAC’s education and girls’ empowerment programs in Africa and Asia.

The Play Lab model ensures children are able to reclaim their right to quality education. Mia worked on the BRAC Play Lab Toolkit, which equipped BRAC’s partners, governments, and international early childhood development stakeholders with the tools to learn from, adopt, and contextualize the BRAC Play Lab model at scale.

Sheetal Tuladhar

Within a week of the 2015 Nepal earthquake, Sheetal received a call from BRAC USA to go to Nepal to help set up BRAC International’s newest office in Kathmandu as a Fellow. As unfortunate as the earthquakes had been, they gave Sheetal an opportunity to go back home and to make a difference.

As a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow, Sheetal had the opportunity to enhance her skills as a development practitioner in disaster resilience, learning first-hand how organizations working closely with local communities can strengthen their own capacities to build the resilience of their beneficiaries.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

(Photos courtesy BRAC USA)

Creating a Successful Fellowship Program

Jack Yatsko, Chief Operating Officer of Clubhouse International, talks about his experience building out a successful fellowship program in partnership with the Hilton Prize Coalition. Clubhouse International ensured they had the right goals and objectives for the fellowship in place to ensure their Fellow had the tools and resources to embark on opening the first Clubhouse in Mongolia. Learn the steps and tips for creating a fellowship that’s a win-win-win for all parties involved.

Creating a Win-Win-Win Fellowship Experience
Jack Yatsko

As a grateful recipient of the Hilton Humanitarian Prize in 2014, Clubhouse International is making a positive impact in 32 countries across the globe. Clubhouse International is the coordinating center for approximately 300 Clubhouses which are psychiatric rehabilitation programs providing a wide range of support for adults who have experienced a mental illness. The Clubhouse Model of Psychiatric Rehabilitation has proven to be a very successful, innovative model, and we steadily receive requests from individuals seeking to develop a Clubhouse in their communities.

The Fellowship Program provided through the Hilton Prize Coalition was a natural match for Clubhouse International to creatively develop a program to assist an individual from Mongolia to start a Clubhouse in her community.

We had received an email from Oyuntugs Bayaraa (Oyut), who was seeking information in how to start a Clubhouse in her home country of Mongolia. She was obtaining a graduate degree from the University of Arkansas at the time and planning to return to Mongolia upon graduation.

Given we have an International Training Base, Gateway, located in Greenville, South Carolina,   we talked to the Hilton Prize Coalition, Oyut, her Academic Advisor, and Gateway about combining the expertise of one of our International Training Bases and providing an immersion training experience. Clubhouse International would then provide specific support to assist Oyut to achieve her goal of starting a Clubhouse in Mongolia.

A unique element to this fellowship is that Oyut is legally blind. Despite having this challenge, Oyut was a determined Fellow and we all agreed to create an environment that Oyut could participate equally with other colleagues in her experience

To ensure a successful fellowship experience, we developed and objectives of the fellowship position with timelines and action steps. We created a blueprint for a win-win-win between Oyut, Clubhouse, and the Hilton Prize Coalition.

The steps included:

1. Designing an initial six-week curriculum

We aimed to give Oyut hands-on experience and tools to bring back to Mongolia to start a Clubhouse. The remaining six weeks of the placement would occur via long distance training so that Oyut could put concepts into practice in her local community.

2. Participating in an orientation program

At The Carriage House in Fort Wayne, Indiana, Oyut attended trainings and visited three area Clubhouses and learned basic concepts about the Clubhouse Model.

3. Attending a two-week Comprehensive Clubhouse Training Program at Gateway

During this training, Oyut lived in a guesthouse with other colleagues from various Clubhouses. She was involved in the work-ordered day at Gateway as well as numerous discussions about the philosophy and practices used in Clubhouses to assist adults with mental illness with their recovery goals

4. Joining an intensive two-day New Clubhouse Development Training

Clubhouse International facilitated this training with groups from six other states. During the training, Oyut developed a detailed action plan, which she now is in the process of implementing in Mongolia.

This experience proved to be a win-win-win experience for all parties:

1. Oyut won because she gained valuable experience and knowledge to give her the tools to start a Clubhouse.

2. Fellow Clubhouses and Clubhouse colleagues won because they learned from Oyut and her unique vantage points. Colleagues learned about her culture and some of the unique challenges she faced in trying to start a first-of-its kind Clubhouse in a country that has never had this kind of model.

3. Clubhouse International won by living out their mission. Clubhouse International seeks to help as many communities as we can to have a Clubhouse in their community. This fellowship offered a unique, creative opportunity to do so.

Oyut is now well on her way in starting a Board of Directors, obtaining an NGO to raise funds to start her Clubhouse and looking for other key supporters.

Ensuring a fellowship placement is successful is no small task. Here are some tips we learned along the way:

1. Develop a detailed Concept paper: Work closely with Hilton Prize Coalition in the design phase. The team was invaluable in sharing their expertise and experience.

2. Gather partners: We had enthusiastic support from The Carriage House, Gateway and others in being a part of an exciting new opportunity to start a Clubhouse in a country where we have no current Clubhouses.

3. Use technology to communicate effectively: We used Zoom frequently to have weekly meetings. Our global distance, whether it was when Oyut was in Arkansas, Indiana, South Carolina, or Mongolia was not a barrier due to today’s technology. I am based in Hawaii and was so happy to finally meet Oyut in South Carolina, but we felt like we already knew each other from prior video conferences.

4. Don’t be afraid of challenges or perceived barriers: We had to deal with visa issues, bringing in University partners, and several clubhouses to make all of this work and we did! Oyut was also very candid about her visual challenges and we were able to still make the fellowship work successfully.

We would like to thank the Hilton Prize Coalition for their support of the Fellows Program. We hope to announce the opening the first Clubhouse in Mongolia soon!

International Day of Zero Tolerance for FGM: Tostan Fellows Make a Difference

February 6 is International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation, a day of raising awareness to eradicate female genital mutilation. Female genital mutilation (FGM) comprises all procedures that involve altering or injuring the female genitalia for non-medical reasons and is recognized internationally as a violation of the human rights of girls and women.

For International Day of Zero Tolerance for FGM, we recognize all that Tostan has done to contribute to the abandonment of FGM. Tostan’s empowerment of women at the local level and  holistic partnership approaches have resonated with governments, civil society, community leaders, and the world’s most vulnerable populations. Hilton Prize Coalition member Tostan is an NGO that empowers African communities to bring about sustainable development and positive social transformation based on respect for human rights.

To further Tostan’s mission, the Hilton Prize Coalition has provided resources to staff two Fellows placements at Tostan. Here are the Fellows who have made an impact at Tostan and beyond.

Learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows Program and all our Fellows do.

Fellows Snapshots

Hannelore Van Bavel

Hannelore worked with Tostan to evaluate the organization’s impact on the practice of female genital cutting. Unlike many other organizations, Tostan does not focus on FGC as a single issue to tackle, but supports wider community empowerment through education. The organization encourages communities to envision their ideal future and believes that they have the capacity to reach their self-defined goals. Rather than coercing communities to give up FGC, they empower communities through education and create opportunities for dialogue about FGC and other issues.

Learn more about Hannelore’s experience and Tostan’s approach in her blog.

Rita Kumar

Rita worked with Tostan to develop a knowledge management system that will allow new team members to reduce their ramp up time, capture more learnings of long term staff, and help Tostan scale their learning using some newer channels. 90% of an organizational institution remains uncaptured, and that knowledge leaves the organization when staff either retire or leave the organization. It is important for an organization to think about what knowledge needs to be captured, how to capture it, maintain it, and share it.  Knowledge is only truly useful if it results in action or other solutions. 

Learn more about Rita’s experience and how she identified knowledge management gaps and opportunities in her blog.

(Photos courtesy of Tostan)

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 23 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Humanitarian Sector Collaboration: Stories of Trainings, Wellbeing, and Landscape Analysis

The Hilton Prize Coalition’s Collaborative Models Program leverages the rich base of talent, assets, experience, and insight from its growing membership, as each Coalition member is able to achieve more collectively than it could individually. 

This year, the Coalition launched five new projects that involve nine organizations. These projects include surgical trainings in Rwanda, a study on the wellbeing of aid workers, disaster risk reduction trainings in Myanmar, a needs assessment of communities in Liberia concerning the protection of land rights, and a collaborative storytelling project on the need for equitable access to treatment for non-communicable diseases.

Here are three of their stories.

Surgeon Training in Rwanda

Co-Lead Organizations: Operation Smile and Partners in Health

Together, Operation Smile and Partners in Health were able to build surgical capacity by providing training for general and plastic surgery residents for a selected cohort of trainees. Addressing the lack of reconstructive plastic surgeons in Rwanda, Operation Smile, in conjunction with the University of Rwanda, formalized a three-week surgical rotation template, identified target trainees, and began putting curriculum in place for plastic surgery residents, general surgery residents, anesthesia residents, nurses and hospital staff.

Humanitarian Wellbeing Project

Co-Lead Organizations: Heifer International and The Task Force for Global Health

In the spring of 2018, The Task Force for Global Health and Heifer International were awarded a Collaborative Models grant from the Hilton Prize Coalition for their Humanitarian Wellbeing Project. This project had its origins in the recognition that the stresses inherent in humanitarian work in settings of human deprivation, suffering, and trauma can lead to burnout, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Such experiences can negatively impact employee wellbeing, and in turn, limit the effectiveness of humanitarian organizations.

Landscape Analysis and Collaboration Assessment

Co-Lead Organizations: BRAC and Landesa

Around the world, land and agriculture are intrinsically linked. In Liberia approximately half of the population lives in rural areas and land and agriculture are a primary source of employment and income. In 2018, the legislature passed the long-awaited Land Rights Bill indicating Liberia is set to embark on an ambitious and robust land reform effort. As the country looks to further empower its farmers, taking a comprehensive approach to integrating land rights and agriculture could be a timely and powerful opportunity. Together, BRAC and Landesa created a program to assess the landscape of Bong County, Liberia. The resulting program report will include findings and recommendations on delivery mechanisms for closing the gaps on land rights. 

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

(Photos courtesy Operation Smile)

Battling Neglected Tropical Diseases through Research: HPC Fellow, The Task Force for Global Health

Henry Emisiko is a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow working with The Task Force for Global Health. At The Task Force for Global Health, Henry researched River Blindness, a Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD). As part of the team, he oversaw sample management, specimen handling, data management, routine laboratory management, and he actively participated in running the ELISA and RDT tests. In his blog, Henry reflects upon his time at The Task Force for Global Health.

Battling Neglected Tropical Diseases through Research
By Henry Emisiko

Becoming a Research scientist is a goal I have passionately nurtured over time. When I applied for the Hilton Prize Coalition fellowship I was full of anticipation and excited to realize this dream. As a graduate in the diverse field of research science, rising to such a platform to work with the Task Force for Global Health thrilled me not only by giving me a chance to apply my knowledge in this field but also by giving me a chance diversify my expertise.

Onchocerciasis, commonly known as river blindness, is a Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) and the second leading cause of blindness worldwide affecting 25 million people, 0.8 million of whom are visually impaired. Onchocerciasis control programs (OCP), which were founded in the year 1974, have seen the elimination of this disease as a public health problem and aim to break transmission through vector control and mass drug administration treatment. Despite a commendable reduction in the number cases, most sub-Saharan African countries are still endemic for Onchocerciasis. The struggle out of this predicament cannot be ignored given the physical and psychological trauma among infected persons not to mention the negative economic and social impacts within the affected populations.

I was enrolled to work with the Task Force for Global Health in partnership with the Kenya Medical Research Institute laboratory team spearheading the Onchocerciasis mapping in selected African countries, including Kenya, Malawi, and Burundi among others as part of monitoring and evaluation of the disease. My fellowship was preceded by a laboratory training for testing techniques by facilitators from the Centre for Disease Control (CDC).

We applied the OV 16 Antigen Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (OV 16 ELISA) and the Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT) when running Dry Blood Spots (DBS) samples from various countries. These tests detect the circulating IGg4 antibodies, which are specific to the recombinant antigen of 16kDa from Onchocerca volvulus, the parasite which causes Onchocerciasis.

As part of the team, I was tasked with sample management, specimen handling and logging, data management, routine laboratory management, and actively participating in running the ELISA and RDT tests for the numerous samples involved. With such a supporting team, I was acquainted with advanced laboratory skills and nurtured the spirit of coordination, team work, accountability, and resilience given the magnitude of the work involved.

Through the fellowship, I was able to develop at both a personal and career level by gaining hands-on experience with scientific work attributed to researching and career profiling. The PMD Pro training and financial management equipped me with focal skills to handle research projects and humanitarian work. They also extended my knowledge and understanding of navigating other related life settings.

Even as I conclude my fellowship, I am humbled to be part of the efforts in fighting NTDs and determined to continue working with the various partners in ensuring the objectives of these projects are met and help secure the African continent from Onchocerciasis and other Neglected Tropical Diseases. Collectively, the last mile of NTDs eradication can be achieved!

In a nutshell, I sincerely wish to thank the Hilton Prize Coalition and The Task Force for Global Health for giving me a chance to work in research as well as for giving me support and mentorship.

(Photos courtesy of the Task Force for Global Health)

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 23 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Update on the Hilton Prize Coalition Humanitarian Wellbeing Project

In the spring of 2018, The Task Force for Global Health and Heifer International were awarded a Collaborative Models grant from the Hilton Prize Coalition for their Humanitarian Wellbeing Project. This project had its origins in the recognition that the stresses inherent in humanitarian work in settings of human deprivation, suffering, and trauma can lead to burnout, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Such experiences can negatively impact employee wellbeing, and in turn, limit the effectiveness of humanitarian organizations.

Humanitarian Wellbeing Project
By: Dr. David Addiss and Dr. Deirdre Guthrie

To better understand these stresses, inventory current practices to address them, and identify opportunities for Hilton Prize Coalition members to improve employee resilience and psychological health, The Task Force for Global Health and Heifer International collaborated with anthropologist Deirdre Guthrie, PhD, at the Keough School of International Affairs, University of Notre Dame. Eleven Hilton Prize Coalition member organizations accepted the invitation to participate: Aravind Eye Care System, ECPAT International, Heifer, icddr,b, IRCT, Operation Smile, Partners in Health, PATH, The Task Force for Global Health, Tostan, and Women for Women International.

This project included interviews with CEOs, Human Resource leaders, and front-line staff members. These interviews, along with organizational responses to an online survey,  assessed policies and practices that support organizational and employee wellbeing, as well as perceived challenges to wellbeing.

Although not statistically representative in terms of our sample, initial interview and survey findings reveal several patterns that are consistent with the literature on burnout. Initial findings suggest that across Hilton Prize Laureate organizations stress is ubiquitous, burnout is not uncommon, and resources for wellbeing are inadequate. These stresses differ depending on whether the organization is primarily engaged in medical missions, community empowerment, research, or providing psychosocial support. In particular, gender impacts staff experiences of personal safety, burnout and other work-related stressors. For example, women report concerns related to safety and security of travel, as well as challenges related to competing responsibilities of work, family, and community. Additional challenges relate to the office contexts of many humanitarian organizations, including tensions related to real and/or perceived differences in compensation and opportunities available to local and international staff. Employees report a strong sense of calling and commitment, which provides a sense of meaning and purpose and may be essential for this kind of work. However, the high degree of self-identification with work also makes it difficult for staff to adequately attend to their own needs for personal and relational wellbeing. Participants reported inadequate self-care, even when organizational leaders care deeply about employee wellbeing.

Reflecting on the Collaborative Models grant, Dave Ross, CEO and President of The Task Force for Global Health, remarked, “the Collaborative Models grant provided us an excellent opportunity learn more about the common challenges that we face as Hilton Prize Laureates, as well as how, collectively, we are addressing these challenges. By making challenges to employee wellbeing more visible and sharing information about current practices with the Hilton Prize Coalition, the project aims to provide Coalition members with information to strengthen and improve their organizations’ employee wellness initiatives.”

Dr. Guthrie and colleagues at The Task Force for Global Health and Heifer International are working on the final report, which they expect to complete in early 2019.

(Photos courtesy of The Task Force for Global Health)

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 23 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Human Trafficking Awareness Day: ECPAT Fellows Make a Difference

January 11 is Human Trafficking Awareness Day, a day of raising awareness to combat trafficking. Human trafficking is a crime in which force, fraud, or coercion are used to compel a person to perform labor, services, or sex. And it affects all populations, including children.

For Human Trafficking Awareness Day, we recognize all that ECPAT International has done to combat the trafficking of children for sexual purposes. Hilton Prize Coalition member ECPAT International is a worldwide network of organizations with one common goal: to end the sexual exploitation of children. ECPAT works at all levels, from supporting shelters for survivors to influencing Heads of States and conducting cutting-edge research on the issue.

To further ECPAT’s mission, the Hilton Prize Coalition has provided resources to staff six Fellows placements at ECPAT International since 2015. Here are the Fellows who have made an impact at ECPAT and beyond through their Country Reports on legal procedures related to trafficking children.

Learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows Program and all our Fellows do.

Fellow Snapshots

Chloe Baury

Research: National laws related to the sexual exploitation of children

Geographic Focus: Cambodia and Mauritania

Biggest lesson at ECPAT? The sexual exploitation of children happens everywhere, and can take many forms: sex tourism, pornography, trafficking, child marriage, prostitution. Children—girls and boys—are at risk in low, middle or high-income countries. No child is immune, and no country is untouched.

Kevin Ryu

Research: Preventive measures and cooperation mechanisms

Geographic Focus: Japan and South Korea

Biggest lesson at ECPAT? It is not only children in vulnerable situations or from developing countries who are targeted, but that every child in the world has the potential to be sexually exploited.

Adaiana Lima

Research: Child protection laws and policies

Geographic Focus: Europe and Asia

Biggest lesson at ECPAT? Unparalleled access to best practices.

James Eckford

Research Interest: Economic Inequality

Biggest lesson at ECPAT? The elements of working in an NGO: the constant struggle for funding, diplomacy with governments, collaboration with other NGOs, engagement with the public, and project management.

Daniela Muenzel

Scope: Communications; World Tourism Day campaign

Geographic Focus: Global, 104 worldwide member organizations aim to end child trafficking globally

Biggest lesson at ECPAT? It is crucial to take active approaches such as providing information in an accessible way, without technical jargon, and to give people something they can actually do something with to support the cause, instead of numbers that might shock them for a moment before they move on with their lives.

Sunethra Sathyanarayanan

Research: Ethical principles of research on sexual exploitation of children

Geographic Focus: Bosnai, Herzegovina, Iraq

Biggest lesson at ECPAT? Learning from teams in the field.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 23 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

 

Collaborative Models: Training Surgeons in Rwanda

Together, Operation Smile and Partners in Health were able to build surgical capacity by providing training for general and plastic surgery residents for a selected cohort of trainees. Addressing the lack of reconstructive plastic surgeons in Rwanda, Operation Smile, in conjunction with the University of Rwanda, formalized a three-week surgical rotation template, identified target trainees, and began putting curriculum in place for plastic surgery residents, general surgery residents, anesthesia residents, nurses and hospital staff.

Training Surgeons in Rwanda
By: Andrew Karima, Operation Smile Rwanda Coordinator

Despite a large NGO presence and many interventions, Rwanda still faces a huge problem: Within the country’s population of 12 million people, there are only two reconstructive plastic surgeons and 18 anesthesiologists. Many Rwandan citizens suffer from trauma and burns that require surgical intervention, but there are simply not enough surgeons to help.

Drawing on a history of medical missions and surgical programming in Rwanda that dates back to 2010, Operation Smile recognized that the country’s surgical needs extended far beyond cleft conditions. Operation Smile thus revitalized its relationship with the University of Rwanda to begin hosting new surgical training rotations in October 2015 with the goal of closing gaps in the national health care system related to cleft care and plastic surgery.

Most health care professionals in Rwanda are concentrated around Kigali, the capital city of this very densely populated nation. However, once Operation Smile volunteers began working at Rwinkwavu District Hospital with Partners in Health/Inshuti Mu Buzima in the region, an opportunity emerged for Operation Smile to support targeted surgical training at that site. The effort started informally with small teams of volunteers in anesthesia and nursing both at Rwinkwavu District Hospital and Butaro Hospital in Rwanda’s northern region before focusing on surgical training. The partnership grew, especially as both Partners in Health/Inshuti Mu Buzima and Operation Smile realized that they could treat, successfully and effectively, the backlog of cleft patients in Rwanda while impacting the surgical capacity for an entire country.

The idea of a formalized surgical training rotation then took hold after a chance meeting with Rwanda’s Minister of Health. The Minister questioned the sustainability of such surgical training. After an explanation of existing partnerships and program strategy, the Ministry of Health signed on as a partner with Partners in Health/Inshuti Mu Buzima at Rwinkwavu Hospital, with Operation Smile as the designated training organization. In conjunction with the University of Rwanda, Operation Smile formalized a three-week surgical rotation template, identified target trainees, and began putting curriculum in place for plastic surgery residents, general surgery residents, anesthesia residents, nurses and hospital staff.

Most recently, Operation Smile conducted a three-week surgical training rotation with Hilton Prize Laureate Partners in Health at the Rwinkravu Hospital in October 2018. Together, Operation Smile and Partners in Health were able to build surgical capacity by providing training for general and plastic surgery residents for a selected cohort of trainees. Partners in Health/Inshuti Mu Buzima contributed expertise and resources throughout planning and execution of the rotation that included identifying and mobilizing patients, transporting patients and medical team volunteers, clearing medical cargo through customs, providing food for the team and lending logistic support. Our trainees and Operation Smile volunteers were able to treat 73 patients, with procedures ranging from burn contractures and critical wounds to tumor excisions and cleft surgeries.

Under the leadership of Partners in Health/Inshuti Mu Buzima former Medical Director, Dr. Alex Coutinho, and now with the current leadership of Dr. Joel Mubiligi, Operation Smile credits its significant impact in Rwanda to the positive and growing contributions of resources deployed by Partners in Health/Inshuti Mu Buzima.

Operation Smile fills system gaps with specialized training and additional programming that includes Wound Care workshops; nutritional counseling and treatment of malnourishment with Ready-to-Use-Therapeutic nutritional food supplementation; American Heart Association (AHA) life support training courses and ongoing equipment and biomedical training for hospital staff.

Operation Smile’s previous Regional Program Manager for East Africa, Roy Kariuki, says, “In 2015, Rwanda was a beautiful country, filled with hope and promise of a sustainable health care system for her people, but was staggering under a huge population who could only access two plastic surgeons in the entire country. Through sheer drive, hard work, and the resiliency of amazing partnerships, we can now proudly say Operation Smile Rwanda has launched the country’s first ever plastic surgery program. I am so proud to have been part of the Operation Smile team that led the charge in making this a reality.”

The training of Rwandan anesthesiologists is led by Dr. Paulin Banguti, who completed much of his medical training in the Democratic Republic of Congo before returning to Rwanda in 2004 to make an impact on the nation’s health care system. “If we can train 60 active anesthesiologists by 2024,” he says, “we’ll see if we can get to 100 or 120 anesthesiologists by 2030 — then we will be closer to the goal.” As noted by all involved, the goal is for Rwanda to produce enough doctors and trained health care professionals to meet the nation’s surgical needs.

Operation Smile continues to stand with the World Health Organization in recognizing access to safe and effective surgical care as a fundamental right for all people. While approximately one third of medical illnesses are surgically treatable, and as many as 5 billion people lack access to safe, effective, and timely surgery. Operation Smile remains committed to working with its partners, and especially the Hilton Prize Coalition, to meet this surgical gap, particularly for low-and middle-income countries.

(Photos courtesy of Operation Smile)

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 23 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

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