Coalition Member Spotlight: The Task Force for Global Health

This week the Hilton Prize Coalition shines a spotlight on The Task Force for Global Health. The Task Force is based in Decatur, GA, USA, with field offices in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and Guatemala City, Guatemala. Its mission is to control and eliminate debilitating infectious diseases and strengthen systems that protect and promote health. The Task Force for Global Health is the 2016 recipient of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize.

Since it was founded in 1984, collaboration has been integral to the work of The Task Force. The organization serves as the secretariat for eight major global health coalitions and helps promote action among its coalition partners to solve large-scale health problems around the world.

The Task Force recently launched a new Focus Area for Compassion and Ethics (FACE). FACE works with other programs at the Task Force to ground the organization’s work in its core values and to help identify and address ethical challenges that arise in global health practice. FACE also conducts research on global health ethics and health equity. Additionally, FACE has convened workshops to deliberate on key emerging ethical challenges to inform global health policy. FACE also helps identify emerging issues for ethics education and training. Through these activities, FACE explores the intersections between compassion, ethical decision-making, and global health practice, as well as how these connections can support program effectiveness and impact.

Another of The Task Force’s new initiatives is the Global Partnership for Zero Leprosy for which it serves as the secretariat. The partnership is a coalition of organizations committed to ending leprosy. While the global burden leprosy has decreased thanks to multi-drug therapy, 200,000 people are still diagnosed with the disease each year, predominantly in India, Brazil, and Indonesia.

By coordinating their initiatives, the Global Partnership for Zero Leprosy seeks to minimize redundancies and increase effectiveness to combat the disease and treat those who are infected. One of the primary focuses of the partnership is developing better methods of detecting and preventing the spread of the disease. After infection, it can take up to 20 years for symptoms to appear, making it difficult to recognize. Other focus areas of the coalition include addressing the stigma and discrimination that accompany people with leprosy. The disease can cause disabilities that prevent those suffering from the disease to hold jobs and fully participate in society.

To learn more about The Task Force’s newest initiatives, visit the FACE and Global Partnership for Zero Leprosy websites.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Photo courtesy of Billy Weeks/The Task Force for Global Health

Photo caption: A health worker tests blood samples in Limbé, Haiti, as part of an enhanced survey to determine prevalence of lymphatic filariasis (LF) following several years of mass drug administration in the region. LF, a neglected tropical disease (NTD), causes disability and mental health problems, stigma, poverty, and social exclusion of affected persons. As countries approach elimination goals, there is a case to be made for NTD programs to commit to caregiving for affected persons in addition to combating infections. 

Collaboration Coordinator: Partnerships in West Africa

Based at Tostan in Senegal, Khady Beye Sow is the Hilton Prize Coalition’s Collaboration Coordinator. As the Collaboration Coordinator, Khady seeks to bring together Coalition members who have a presence in West Africa. In her blog, she reflects on the origin of her position and moments of Coalition collaboration.

Coalition Collaboration in West Africa
By: Khady Beye Sow

Becoming a Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize Winner is certainly one of the greatest international recognitions for a non-governmental organization. When Tostan received this prize in 2007, it joined the ranks of organizations which have made extraordinary contributions toward alleviating human suffering. The Hilton Prize Coalition unites all of these organizations in an effort to identify synergies to advance a collective vision for a better world.

For us at Tostan, we work to empower girls, women, and communities to take the lead in the movement for human rights and sustainable development across West Africa. Collaborating with fellow Hilton Prize Laureates, we have the opportunity to share our holistic model of community-led development with more specialized organizations while learning from their work and successes. Moreover, as organizations work together, this creates greater opportunities for access to knowledge and funding to achieve maximum impact.

In my position as the Collaboration Coordinator of the Hilton Prize Coalition (HPC) in West Africa, my first task is to identify the organizations working in the region. Then, when looking at the list of the 22 best-in-class organizations that form the Hilton Prize Coalition, I ask myself: In what areas could these organizations collaborate? Where could they combine their efforts to achieve maximum positive impact? What can they learn from each other?

A previous effort to unite the Hilton Prize Laureates in West Africa had already borne great results. In 2013, what was then called the Hilton Laureates Collaborative had been the starting point for the collaboration between Tostan and Amref Health Africa on the Zero Fistula Project with the United Nations Population Fund.

It was after a meeting organized for the Hilton Laureates Collaborative members that Amref Health Africa and Tostan identified the possibility of working together in order to provide an appropriate solution to effectively address obstetric fistula in Senegal. The two organizations then officially partnered to lead a holistic project which included community-level awareness-raising, medical treatment, and training local health staff as well as the reintegration and the rehabilitation of women living with fistula. The approach for this project, fully designed by Tostan and Amref Health Africa, was integrated and holistic, taking into account all aspects of the treatment of this medical condition.

This type of partnership is what the Hilton Prize Coalition is all about. As I meet with representatives from BRAC, Landesa, Aravind Eye Care System, Amref Health Africa, SOS Children’s Villages, IRCT’s member African Centre for the Prevention and Resolution of Conflicts, Humanity & Inclusion, Women for Women International, Doctors Without Borders, PATH, Heifer, and the International Rescue Committee—all of which are active in West Africa —I realize the immense impact that Hilton Prize Coalition members have in the region.

I look forward to building the pathways for effective communication and collaboration between these organizations in West Africa. First and foremost, there is a necessity to develop a mapping of the Coalition member presence in West Africa to find out who is working where. Secondly, in order to understand which collaborations could flourish between the Coalition members, there is a need to identify the areas of expertise and the programs currently underway. Then come communications: How can we create a platform for all the West African members to communicate with each other and develop durable collaborations?

As an organization with a holistic and participatory approach, Tostan is ideally suited to bring together organizations with such a diverse range of expertise and experience across the region. As I study the work of each of the Coalition members, I am amazed by the impact and scale of their collective achievements towards improving the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people throughout the world, and I am grateful to have the opportunity to take part in advancing their collective missions for greater good.

I look forward to sharing more about our achievements as I continue to establish connections with the members and develop the next steps to help the West-African-based Hilton Prize Coalition members reach their full potential.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

 

HPC Fellow: Hrithik Bansal, BRAC USA

Hrithik Bansal is a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow working with BRAC USA. He worked with the senior leadership of the nonprofit to develop and implement strategies towards new revenue-generating activities. In his blog, Hrithik reflects upon BRAC’s business model.

BRAC’s move to financial sustainability
By: Hrithik Bansal

My interest in development began early. Born and raised in India, I was fascinated by current affairs from a young age. I was aware that India, with its closed economy, was not as well off as countries in the West. So, when I came to the United States as an undergraduate, I was curious why these differences existed between countries, and I focused my pursuits on trying to understand their causes. This has taken me to many different parts of the world, working for various organizations, all with the goal of bettering humanity.

For the past year, I was privileged to have the opportunity to work at BRAC USA, the North American affiliate of BRAC. One of the world’s largest development organizations, BRAC is dedicated to empowering people living in poverty. Working across 11 countries in South Asia and Africa, the organization touches the lives of more than 120 million people worldwide. It takes a holistic approach to alleviating poverty with programs that include microfinance, education, healthcare, food security programs, and more.

Much of BRAC’s success is attributable to its visionary founder, Sir Fazle Hasan Abed, whose leadership and zeal for the principles of business management created an organization that operates effectively and efficiently. For example, BRAC has long sought to lessen its reliance on donor funding over the years, creating a number of successful, independent social enterprises in the textiles, retail, finance, and agriculture industries. It has received recognition for this business-driven approach from many in the business community and the international press.

Given the changing aspirations of the people it serves, BRAC expects that many of its programs will adopt the social enterprise model, at least in part, if they have not already. This means that some of the projects in these programs would generate revenue by selling services to clients, producing a financial return while creating social impact. This financial surplus would help fund the rest of the program.

In certain markets, there is a clear need for a reliable provider that can offer quality services at an affordable price. I had the opportunity to work with some of the programs to help with this transition. Using my expertise in business strategy and my work experience in other developing countries, I worked closely with several programs to help craft the strategy for these new revenue-generating enterprises.

In Bangladesh, about 70 percent of court cases are related to land. In one of the most densely populated countries in the world, where agriculture is the mainstay of most rural poor, land is a vital resource. In fact, it is not only of economic importance, but also of emotional significance, as it is typically bequeathed by fathers. As a result, land is often a contentious issue, and disputes commonly end up in court. Poor households might spend up to about half of their income to resolve these cases, which can take more than a decade to resolve. To make matters worse, corruption and bureaucracy often complicate government land services.

To help Bangladeshi citizens solve land-related issues, the BRAC Human Rights and Legal Services program has initiated a land service enterprise, complementing its existing work in this arena advocating for the poor and underserved. Its Integrated Land Services Offices will soon offer reliable land-related services while also generating revenue for the larger program. At the same time, the service dignifies the process by which people’s land issues are resolved. The offices also employ trained land surveyors who are skilled at measuring land, helping to sort out disputes relating to land measurement before they escalate.

Finding a business case that balanced the social aspects of the enterprise against the financial viability of the firm was deeply enriching, and one that leveraged my unique skill set and experience. BRAC is seeking funding for the enterprise now, hopeful that it will be able to improve the lives of many more Bangladeshis. I am thankful to the Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows Program for their support during my time at BRAC USA. To play even a small role in making a difference in the lives of so many fellow South Asians was an inspirational experience, and one I will not soon forget.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Collaborative Models: Accomplishing More Together

The Hilton Prize Coalition’s Collaborative Models Program leverages the rich base of talent, assets, experience, and insight from its growing membership, as each Coalition member is able to achieve more collectively than it could individually. 

This year, the Coalition launched five new projects that involve nine organizations. These projects include surgical trainings in Rwanda, a study on the wellbeing of aid workers, disaster risk reduction trainings in Myanmar, a needs assessment of communities in Liberia concerning the protection of land rights, and a collaborative storytelling project on the need for equitable access to treatment for non-communicable diseases.

The Coalition is delighted and eager to see the results of each Collaborative Model as well as their future impact.

Current Collaborative Models Programs

Surgeon Training in Rwanda

Co-Lead Organizations: Operation Smile and Partners in Health

Operation Smile, in partnership with Partners in Health, the University of Rwanda, and the Rwanda Ministries of Health and Education, aims to train surgery residents in Rwanda in order to increase the country’s surgical capacity. This training will prepare residents to deal with current surgical needs in Rwanda, better equipping them to serve the population. The program will also pilot a nutrition intervention program for malnourished patients who otherwise would not be eligible for surgery as well as provide hands on life support training and wound care.

Humanitarian Wellbeing Project

Co-Lead Organizations: Heifer International and The Task Force for Global Health

Recognizing the challenges that international aid workers face, The Task Force for Global Health and Heifer International will conduct research and deliver recommendations to help improve the resilience, emotional health, and psychological wellbeing of aid workers who often experience burnout, depression, and PTSD. These recommendations will aim to improve the lives of aid workers and the quality of aid services delivered.

Disaster Risk Reduction Trainings in Myanmar

Co-Lead Organizations: HelpAge USA and Humanity & Inclusion

Through their partnership, HelpAge USA and Humanity & Inclusion will provide Disaster Risk Reduction trainings to help protect vulnerable groups and train government officials on how to respond during disasters The project focuses on a region of Myanmar that has been prone to climate disasters in the past. The goal of this collaboration is to improve disaster plans and policies for older people and people with disabilities, creating a more inclusive approach to disaster risk reduction.

Landscape Analysis and Collaboration Assessment

Co-Lead Organizations: BRAC and Landesa

Viewing land rights as a critical factor in agricultural productivity, BRAC and Landesa will create a program to assess the landscape of Grand Gedeh, Liberia. The resulting program report will include findings and recommendations on delivery mechanisms for closing the gaps on land rights. It will also include a broader addendum that will feature mutual learnings and challenges faced by BRAC and Landesa throughout the project as well as provide lessons learned to help structure future collaborative projects.

Non-Communicable Diseases Storytelling Project

Co-Lead Organizations: HelpAge USA and PATH

HelpAge USA and PATH will collaborate to address global inequity in access to treatment for non-communicable diseases—inequity which leads to a disproportionate amount of NCD-related deaths in lower to middle income countries. The lack of urgency and understanding that has prevented a stronger response to this issue will be addressed through a storytelling project that will document the realities and challenges of those seeking treatment for NCDs. The storytelling project will include crucial, but often neglected voices, such as the perspectives of older people.

To learn more about the Collaborative Models Program, visit the Collaborative Models page.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

HPC Fellow: Hannelore Van Bavel, Tostan

Hannelore Van Bavel is a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow with Tostan, an international organization that empowers African communities to bring about sustainable development and positive social transformation based on respect for human rights. Hannelore works with Tostan to evaluate the organization’s impact on the practice of female genital cutting. In her blog, she reflects upon this work and upon the dialogue of “victimhood.”

 Hannelore is currently a PhD Candidate in Anthropology and Sociology at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London and a SOAS Research Studentship holder. Her research project focuses on the construction and diffusion of discourses on female genital cutting.

Culture: A Source for Change, Not a Tool of Oppression

By: Hannelore Van Bavel

I became interested in discourses on Africa, and African women in particular, through explorations of gender, race, and colonial thought. I was particularly influenced by the article Under Western Eyes, in which author Chandra Mohanty criticizes how feminist development scholarship often reinforces the idea of women in the Global south as passive victims of culture.

That interest in dialogue on the “victimhood” of women led to research on the concept of agency among minor sex workers in Tanzania for my master’s in Sociology. In Tanzania, I befriended a fellow student who is the co-founder of a civil society organization for his ethnic group, the Maasai. When he heard I was to start a second master’s in Gender and Diversity, he suggested I focus on female genital cutting (FGC).

Hannelore participated in community wellbeing training at the Tostan training Centre with participants from east Africa who work on FGC and/or child marriage in their counties.

I was initially hesitant. FGC seemed to me to be the embodiment of a discourse that I had come to find so problematic: African women oppressed by their culture in need of saving by outsiders. My master’s thesis grappled with questions of how FGC is understood, discussed and approached: it became a critique of how outsider interference, when culturally insensitive and ignorant of the complexities of FGC, can cause a backlash and undermine indigenous efforts to change the practice.

My PhD project allows me to continue exploring the importance of discourses on FGC. Tostan is central to it, because of the important influence Tostan has had and continues to have on the sector’s understanding of female genital mutilation and cutting (FGM/C). I participated in Tostan’s 10-day training on community wellbeing: a unique opportunity to gain insight on Tostan’s work and history. I am very grateful that the Hilton Prize Coalition fellowship now offers me the opportunity to obtain an even deeper understanding of Tostan.

Unlike many other organizations, Tostan does not focus on FGC as a single issue to tackle, but supports wider community empowerment through education. The organization encourages communities to envision their ideal future and believes that they have the capacity to reach their self-defined goals. Rather than coercing communities to give up FGC, they empower communities through education and create opportunities for dialogue about FGC and other issues.

Tostan’s approach thus draws from a very different narrative than the African-women-are-victims discourse: there is no longer a victimized women versus oppressive men binary; culture becomes a source for change rather than a tool of oppression; and communities do not need saving by outsiders because they know best what they want and how to get there.

This approach has been recognized internationally for its effectiveness in ending FGC. My fellowship with Tostan allows me to dive deeper into how Tostan’s effectiveness is measured and what Tostan can teach to the sector.

There is a general lack of quality evaluations for FGC interventions. Two literature reviews of existing FGC program evaluations came up with only 16 studies. Within that general paucity of literature, Tostan does very well, with 25% of the identified quality evaluations being evaluations of Tostan’s program.

Another challenge to the FGC sector is the perception of what constitutes quality when it comes to evaluating FGC programs. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) are often considered the gold standard in the development sector. RCT typically have only one (or a few) outcome variable(s). In the case of measuring the impact of FGC programs, prevalence of FGC would be the logical outcome variable. However, women’s cutting status cannot ethically or practically be observed, and so data are based on self-reporting. It is unclear how reliable self-reporting is. Is an RCT, which is very expensive, the best use of resources?  Particularly when it results in only one (or a few) outcomes, of which the reliability is unclear?

Through 21 years of learning – from communities first, but also from academic research – Tostan has come to a complex understanding of how FGC functions as social norm. Such complexity cannot be captured with a single outcome variable. While Tostan leads in terms of evaluating its program according to the existing gold standards of program evaluation, I believe it has an ever bigger leadership role to play in challenging how change related to FGC can be captured. Tostan has been working on exciting approaches based on social norm theory. Central to this approach is a thorough understanding of the societies, in which Tostan is active, feedback from the people who participate in the program, and a deep respect for participating communities. I believe that the FGC sector and the wider development sector have a lot to gain by replacing positivistic evaluation methods, which believe that the social is objective and measurable, by more constructivist methods that acknowledge the importance of context and the centrality of humans as change makers.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

HPC Fellow: Izehi Oriaghan, Landesa

Izehi Oriaghan is a current Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow with Landesa, a nonprofit organization that partners with governments and local organizations to secure legal land rights for the world’s poorest families. In her blog, Izehi reflects upon land rights in Nigeria.

A Quick Look at Women’s Land and Inheritance Rights in Nigeria
by Izehi Oriaghan

In my academic and professional experience, I have been confronted with women’s issues, including child or early marriage, the limited participation of women in business and political leadership, and gender-based violence. But until this summer, I had never really contemplated the status of the Nigerian woman in regards to her right to own or inherit land.

Working with Landesa this summer as a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow has been a great learning opportunity for me. I have been able to explore an aspect of international development and women’s empowerment that, before now, I had not given much thought. And I am grateful for this experience. In my role, I conducted background research to support Landesa’s emerging global women’s land rights (WLR) campaign, which seeks to bridge the implementation gap between law and practice in fostering WLR globally. This work has led me to take a closer look at the WLR landscape in Nigeria.

Land acquisition for men and women in Nigeria, for the most part, is through inheritance. And inheritance right to a great extent is influenced by the customs in different parts of the country. Most often, men have a greater chance of inheriting land over women, and sadly this patrilineal system of land inheritance still continues to date despite the provisions of the law. Hence, there is a huge gender gap in land ownership in Nigeria, and less than 2% of women, compared to 17% men, own land by themselves ( Brunelli, De La O Campos, Doss, & Slavchevska, 2016a).

Landesa: http://www.landesa.org/wp-content/uploads/infographic-womens-land-rights.jpg

The 1978 Land Use Act of Nigeria established a state-owned land system that allowed similar opportunities for men and women to acquire or inherit land (Brunelli et al., 2016a). However, only legally married women could benefit from this act, so it did not necessarily improve the ownership or inheritance rights for women in Nigeria. Transfer of land ownership is still largely guided by customary practices that discriminate against women, especially because the average citizen has poor knowledge of the statutory laws with respect to land( Brunelli, De La O Campos, Doss, & Slavchevska, 2016b).

Based on my own personal inquiries on the subject and published research, I have found that few land owners in Nigeria have the formal documents to prove land ownership. This is why statutory laws, in comparison to customary practices, are not always as effective in ensuring secure and equitable land tenure for women and men because the legal ownership of many such lands cannot be proven. The customary system in Nigeria is quite flexible and approves the right to transfer land without seeking government approval. Consequently, up to 40% of land in Nigeria may be prone to legal disputes over rightful ownership, which means a large portion of land in Nigeria is under insecure tenure (Brunelli et al., 2016b).

In comparing women’s inheritance rights outcomes in customary and statutory settings, I decided to sample the opinions of women from different parts of the country. I wanted to know the typical Nigerian woman’s experience in spite of the law.

Shade Pedro is from the western part of Nigeria. According to her, it is not culturally common for girls or women to inherit land from their parents, except in rare cases when there is no male offspring. Even these rare cases largely depend on the level of exposure or belief of the family elders. It is possible that a woman can inherit her husband’s land if she is legally married to him, but she runs a risk of losing such rights if she bares no children. Shade is from one of such enlightened families, and she is able to inherit her father’s land as the first daughter of the family. This is not always the case.

Unlike Shade, Stella Isimen is unable to inherit her father’s property even being the first child of the family, and this is the plight of many girls and women in the southern part of Nigeria. As a legally married woman already past retirement age, she has no land or title to her name, and her children will inherit her husband’s property, not her.

Uche Precious is from the eastern part of Nigeria and shares a similar experience with Stella. A girl child cannot inherit her father’s land if she has male siblings. If widowed and without a male child, her husband’s land or property goes to his male siblings. If she bares male children, the inheritance rights fall to them. In essence, a girl or woman from the east does not have any particular inheritance rights.

The scenario is equally worse to the north of the country where women, for customary and religious reasons, often relinquish their inheritance rights due to social pressures.

I must mention that one thing is common for all these experiences, and it is the fact that these women all alluded to some improvement in customary practices due to increasing literacy and awareness of gender equality. Thus, I might conclude that an intervention especially for knowledge and capacity development for local citizens, provision of formal land titles, a review of inheritance and land laws, and improved implementation systems will go a long way to improve the land rights of women in Nigeria.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.


References

Brunelli, C., De la O Campos, A.,  Doss, C., & Slavchevska, V.(2016a, December). Beyond Ownership: Tracking Progress on Women’s Land Rights in Sub-Saharan Africa (Working paper No. 15). Retrieved http://gsars.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/WP-14.12.2016-Beyond-Ownership.pdf

Brunelli, C., De la O Campos, A.,  Doss, C., & Slavchevska, V. (2016b). Beyond Ownership: Women’s and Men’s Land Rights in Sub-Saharan Africa (Rep.). Retrieved from http://pubdocs.worldbank.org/en/170131495654694482/A2-ABCA-Slavcheska-et-al-2016-Beyond-ownership-working-paper.pdf

HPC Fellow: Tsega Tseffera, SOS Children’s Villages

The Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows Program aims to develop a robust pipeline of humanitarian leaders, offering a unique opportunity for young professionals to work alongside some of the world’s most prestigious organizations. Through placements with the Coalition at one or more of its members across the globe, Fellows engage in a variety of ways on topics that span the international development and humanitarian sectors.

In the following three-part video series, Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow Tsega Negussie Tseffera describes the impact of SOS Children’s Villages (SOS) on her life.

In the film From Studies to Practice: Immersion, Tsega outlines her range of responsibilities as part of the Communications and Marketing team at SOS. She describes her primary focus on developing content that highlighted SOS’s customized fundraising efforts.

WATCH THE VIDEO

In  the film From Studies to Practice: Mentorship, Tsega emphasizes the impact her mentor had throughout her fellowship. She explains how mentorship influenced her passion for the mission of SOS, believing the mentorship positively affected the quality of her work.

WATCH THE VIDEO

In the film From Studies to Practice: Outcomes, Tsega describes her current work back in her hometown Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and how she is able to assist different organizations with the refined communication skills she developed during her fellowship.

WATCH THE VIDEO

Through her fellowship, Tsega was able to drive forward the mission and vision of SOS. She provided support with the development and implementation of the organization’s brand awareness campaign both within the United States and abroad. Working on these projects within Communications and Marketing team allowed her to grow not only her communication skills, but her collaboration skills as well.

Tsega now looks forward to making an impact in her home nation, Ethiopia, and she is excited to utilize the expertise she gained through her work with SOS.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition
The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on  Facebook.

Coalition Member Spotlight: St Christopher’s Hospice

The Hilton Prize Coalition shines a spotlight on Laureate member St Christopher’s HospiceSt Christopher’s was the world’s first modern hospice established by Dame Cicely Saunders in 1967, transforming care for the dying around the world. In 2001, St Christopher’s was awarded the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize for the work originated by Dame Cicely through the hospice. Now, over 50 years later, the world still looks to St Christopher’s for advice, support, and ideas in how best to care for people through serious illness, death, and bereavement.

St Christopher’s has experience supporting people at some of the most difficult and frightening times in their lives and, in the last year alone, provided that support to over 6,500 across the diverse communities of south east London. Striving to have the resources to reach everyone who needs them, St Christopher’s needed an innovative solution to make quality end of life care available to all.

The new Learning Hub will equip and empower members of the public to support their loved ones at home. 

For St Christopher’s, education is the answer. Based on their model, good education underpins good care. In the last year, St Christopher’s provided training to over 7,000 people from 45 different countries; working with them to develop and improve care for those living with life-changing conditions and their families wherever they are in the world. Their Education Centre is the world’s first specializing in palliative care; however, their current facilities are outdated, inflexible, and without the technology needed to help them connect effectively with people who want to learn remotely.

That’s why, to mark their 50th anniversary, St Christopher’s embarked on a campaign to build a new, world-class education center known as The Learning Hub. This Hub will support St Christopher’s in realizing their vision of a world in which all dying people and those close to them have access to the care and support they need—when and wherever they need it.

St Christopher’s has the skills to equip and empower members of the public to care for their loved ones. End of life care is not restricted to professionals anymore. St Christopher’s believes that it’s essential to provide support to the general public, patients, families, and carers if they are to effect real change for dying people and their families across the world.As well as increasing the number of people they train, the Hub will also enable St Christopher’s to pioneer new ways of teaching. Many people want to play a part in caring for someone they love at the end of life but often lack the confidence or skills required to do so. One wife of a patient supported by St Christopher’s outlined the critical nature of this need: “We had never nursed anyone before, let alone a terminally ill person, and we really struggled to cope with some of the most basic, simple caring tasks. One day we saw a nurse at St Christopher’s do this so beautifully and we wept because we wanted to do it that beautifully and didn’t know how. We realised with a few basic nursing skills we could have done a much better job and, perhaps, kept him at home much longer.”

An artist’s impression of the Learning Hub

The Learning Hub is just one of the ways St Christopher’s will ensure generations to come will have the benefit of the care at St Christopher’s. On Friday, June 22, which would have been their founder, Dame Cicely Saunders, 100th birthday, St Christopher’s was proud  to see the first spade enter the ground and building work on the Learning Hub begin.

Works are expected to take 18 months to complete. To find out more about the Learning Hub visit St Christopher’s website.

(Photos courtesy of St Christopher’s Hospice)

About The Hilton Prize Coalition
The Hilton Prize Coalition is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the Fellows Program, the Collaborative Models Program and the Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

 

HPC Fellow: Vida Garcia, Global Impact

Vida Garcia is a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow based at Global Impact, the Secretariat of the Hilton Prize Coalition. During her fellowship, she had the opportunity to engage in event planning, data analysis, and communication projects. Here are some of her reflections on leadership and her experiences at Global Impact.

Helping through Leadership
By Vida Garcia

woman speaking at podium

Vida speaking at a United States Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) naturalization ceremony.

In his 45 years of life, my father has touched many lives: friends, neighbors, former drug addicts, refugees, and my own. He has the innate ability to build long-lasting relationships; he is a paradigm of service. To my father, service is more than what you do, it is defined by who you are. From a very young age, I have aspired to affect people in the manner that my dad does, but my vision has expanded beyond my immediate neighbors. I decided to study International Relations and Political Science, so that I can better understand global affairs and, through the use of diplomacy, help solve future conflict in the world. Like my dad, I want to be a leader who inspires people and brings them together to help those in need.

There are many theories of leadership. For example, some people believe that leaders are born, not made, but in my experience the opposite is also true. Sometimes life takes you on a rollercoaster of adventures that end up shaping who you are and who you are going to become. My dad always says that everyone’s rollercoaster is different. In the end, it is up to you to either let those experiences dishearten and crush you or strengthen your character to help you grow. He says that people will try to tell you who you are based on where you’ve been, but that just means you’ll have to work a little harder to show them “no, this is who I am.” If you’ve risen from adversity by overcoming the obstacles that have come your way, people will eventually see the strength within you.

One thing everyone seems to agree on is that the most effective leaders are those who lead by example, whether by setting an example themselves or by following the examples of those who came before them. In my experience, some qualities that effective leaders have in common are being consistent in their work, setting up realistic and concrete goals for their teams, providing clear direction and context, and being effective mentors.

Something that is often overlooked is that effective leaders are able to inspire. From my dad, I’ve learned that true leaders make people want to follow them based on their character, morality, or work ethic. Throughout my fellowship with Global Impact, the Hilton Prize Coalition’s Secretariat, I’ve been surrounded by leaders that do just that. I’ve noticed that they find passion in their work and in turn project this passion through their leadership styles, and this has been one of the most valuable lessons I’ve learned. By following their lead, I am developing the skills necessary to become a leader who inspires others.

Based at the Secretariat, Global Impact, I have had the unique opportunity to immerse myself in each Laureate organization and its mission. Supporting the Hilton Prize Coalition Fellowship and Storytelling Programs, I have gained skills in event planning, data collection and analysis, as well as communications. My primary work for the Fellowship Program is to plan a summit where three cohorts of Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows can convene to catch up, share lessons learned, and deepen their connections. The summit will allow Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows to strengthen their network of like-minded peers as they begin to advance through their careers in the humanitarian sector.

The Fellows network provides future humanitarian leaders with a network of support to lean on and glean ideas from as they do the hard work of international development. Through planning this summit, I’m doing what I’ve always wanted to do. I’m bringing people together to help those in need. A common piece of advice I’ve heard as a student is to find my passion and follow it. I’ve been lucky enough to have found my passion early on through my dad. Now, I’m able to pursue a career that complements it. Knowing why your work matters and that you are making an impact in people’s lives around the world is one of the most fulfilling parts of working with the Hilton Prize Coalition.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

HPC Fellow: James Eckford, ECPAT International

James Eckford is a current Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow with ECPAT International, the only international NGO network solely dedicated to the fight against the sexual exploitation of children around the world. In his blog, James reflects upon the mission of ECPAT, human dignity, sustainable development, and his work.

Human Rights: A Question of Dignity and Economic Equality
By James Eckford

As I neared the end of my bachelor’s degree in International Relations and faced the dilemma of choosing a thesis topic, I found myself instinctively disregarding the high-profile and glamorous subject of international diplomacy and instead focused on the gritty and deeply frustrating world of human rights. Making this decision was not a practical or logical choice, the field of human rights is famously exclusive and highly competitive. I thus decided to work abroad, learn some languages and save up for a masters’ degree.

This journey abroad further fueled my passion. Living in Beijing for three years, I gained a practical and visceral experience in human rights. One that turned my perspectives and ideology upside down. In China, the very term “human rights” is taboo. To claim a right from the government is to declare they are not doing their job, and it is not the duty of the citizen to tell the government how to do their job. In human rights, we strive to fight for those who have no voice, but what of those who have a voice, face injustice, but choose not to use it?

This fundamental question drove me to write my thesis on pollution protesting in China and examine the possibility of a human rights consciousness emerging in Chinese society. Could smog be the phenomenon that pushes Chinese people to realize that they can preserve their dignity in the face of government repression? Dignity is a universal concept, yet deeply subjective. The threshold for loss of dignity in China may be higher than that in the west, but it exists.

Surprisingly, this abstract question of human dignity would be relevant to the subject of my internship: sexual exploitation of children in travel and tourism. Do child victims of sexual exploitation see themselves as victims or rights holders? The core problem of this particular manifestation of sexual exploitation of children (SEC) is economic inequality; tourism allows two vastly separate worlds to collide. The introduction of wealth via tourists into poor spaces creates an inevitable tension of disparity that is conducive to exploitation.

While the tourist finds themselves in an apparently poorly governed and culturally alien environment, the family of the child or even the child themselves has found an opportunity to earn well above the average salary. What qualifies this as exploitation is the innocence of the child, their lack of control or autonomy, and complete surrender of humanity and dignity. The economic and social conditions that have resulted from distant historical events led to this exchange; those events, far beyond the world of the exploiter and exploited, have affected millions of children around the world for generations. Only just recently is the world waking up to the horrific injustices borne by the nexus of gender and income inequality. The #MeToo movement has enlightened much of the western world to the dangers of victim blaming, challenging previously accepted norms and paradigms that caused silent suffering.

Even though mindsets seem to be slowly evolving for the better, how do we solve injustices brought about by economic inequality? It’s a question that begs such a large structural adjustment of the global economy and markets that it seems insurmountable, however, the rhetoric of sustainable development promises change. It seeks to essentially adjust the language of capitalism from growth-based targets to sustainable ones in order to address profit-based decisions which end up having adverse effects on communities and populations.

ECPAT’s ambitious strategy to fight the sexual exploitation of children in travel and tourism (SECTT) is to take both the sustainable development and corporate social responsibility route because the private sector is used to facilitate sexual violence against children. The private sector’s role cannot be understated. I strongly believe that awareness campaigns and child protection policies can make a difference in deterring SECTT. While there is no typical offender, a large proportion of offenders are in fact situational, it is the perception of tolerance, acceptability, impunity, and power imbalance that spurs them to sexually exploit children, rather than an inherent attraction to children. This means that collaborative action between the private sector, governments, NGOs, and law enforcement can be effective in reducing SECTT around the world; situational offenders are unlikely to commit this crime if they respect the laws and society of their destination as much as their source country.

Besides the subject itself, ECPAT taught me many things about working in an NGO: the constant struggle for funding, diplomacy with governments, collaboration with other NGOs, engagement with the public, and project management. It was finally a chance to see how everything I learned in my master’s degree could be put into practice, as well as to see things that are never taught in the classroom, such as procurement, budget approvals, and concept notes.

My next step is to build a career that fights trafficking and exploitation on a wider scale, both labor and sexual, both adults and children. Above all I want to fight for the rights of those whom society extends the least sympathy.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

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