Coalition Member Spotlight: ECPAT International

In recognition of the World Day against Trafficking in Persons, July 30, the Hilton Prize Coalition shines a spotlight on the ECPAT International, the only international NGO network solely dedicated to the fight against the sexual exploitation of children around the world. The 2013 recipient of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, ECPAT voices the rights of child victims of sexual exploitation and advocates for national policies that will protect them.

ECPAT International’s Network Development Intern, Mairi Calder, produced a short film about the collective impact of ECPAT’s work. She explains the meaning of “trafficking of children for sexual purposes” and highlights the critical nature of ECPAT’s advocacy.

ECPAT tirelessly works to raise awareness on the sexual exploitation of children with the aim of creating a global outcry and inspiring new solutions. Here are three of ECPAT’s initiatives that seek to eradicate the sexual exploitation of children:

ECPAT’s campaign Words Matter highlights the importance of using correct terminology to prevent trivialization of the issue and stigmatization of victims. ECPAT urges the public to never use terms that trivialize the sexual assault of children.

Another ECPAT initiative is the Bill of Rights, which focuses on child survivors’ recovery experiences within the judicial system and reintegration programs. In unison with their member organizations, ECPAT advocates for effective prevention and protection systems, stronger legal frameworks, as well as better implementation and cooperation between governments, the private sector, and civil society.

Through the Survivors Voices platform, ECPAT vocalizes the experiences of survivors around the world. This survivor-led movement seeks to halt the spread and ultimately eradicate the sexual exploitation of children.

ECPAT’s initiatives coordinate evidence-based advocacy to strengthen national justice and protection systems and expand investment in the fight against all forms of child sexual exploitation. For more information on ECPAT’s initiatives, visit ECPAT’s website.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

July Laureate Highlights

This week the Hilton Prize Coalition showcases the work of five of its outstanding Laureates. This collection of news updates and featured blogs demonstrate the depth of the organizations that make up the Coalition. The Coalition seeks to amplify its members’ impact and promote collaboration in humanitarian assistance, human rights, development, education, and health.

In April, icddr,b’s project, Strengthening Health, Applying Research Evidence (SHARE), organized the panel “Engaging Private Sector to Achieve Universal Health Coverage in Bangladesh.” The discussion served to identify policy challenges in the private health sector in Bangladesh, explore solutions, and attribute to developing policy recommendations for future implementation.

Tostan advocates for an end to child/forced marriage, female genital cutting, child trafficking, and child labor. Focused on human rights and children’s rights, Tostan’s Child Protection Module trainings build awareness of the various moral, social, and legal norms that affect children. Tostan is also a partner of Girls Not Brides, a global partnership of more than 900 civil society organizations committed to ending child marriage and enabling girls to fulfill their potential. Tostan recently attended their second global Girls Not Brides meeting in Kuala Lampur, Malaysia.

The Task Force for Global Health’s new program MedSurplus Alliance (MSA) focuses on improving the quality and effectiveness of donated medical supplies. They also ensure that enough adequately trained personnel are available to use and maintain donated equipment. In June, the Task Force responded to Guatemala’s Fuego volcano disaster by providing critical medical supplies and equipment to healthcare workers on the frontlines.

Heifer International advances gender equity work to empower women around the world. This blog asks Heifer staffers what the term “women’s empowerment” actually means to them. For Heifer staff member Anahit Ghazanchyan, women’s empowerment means freedom.

In this briefer on their signature program Girls Project, Landesa highlights recent achievements in West Bengal, India. Landesa’s Girls Project aims to help girls realize their land rights as women. To improve girls’ economic and social prospects, Landesa addresses the lack of knowledge, common practices, and biases of land rights.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Coalition Member Spotlight: International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims

In recognition of International Day in Support of Victims of Torture, June 26, The Hilton Prize Coalition shines a spotlight on the International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims (IRCT).  Advocating for the right to rehabilitation of torture victims everywhere, IRCT’s initiatives help victims rebuild their lives after torture and provide a system of support for survivors.

Established in 1985 in response to the constant use of torture by both states and non-state actors around the world, the International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims (IRCT) vocalizes the rights of hundreds of thousands of torture victims. IRCT was awarded the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize in 2003 for their commitment to provide quality rehabilitation services that include medical, psychological, legal and social support.

man holding caneTorture leaves severe scars on the victim and can impact future generations due to lasting physical and psychological damage. Self-isolation and anxiety are common symptoms among many torture survivors. Depression, insomnia, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are also some of the cognitive conditions that affect victims of torture. Even though these conditions take a special toll on the entire family, in particular, children are most vulnerable to the after-effects of torture.

Through its Global Anti-Torture Evidence project, IRCT aims to further the global fight against torture. Using data collected throughout the rehabilitation process, IRCT strives to prevent torture, help victims rebuild their lives, and prosecute perpetrators. For this purpose, the IRCT relies on its innovative Anti-Torture Database (ATD), which is used in 43 member centers across 35 countries. These centers not only provide rehabilitation support to torture survivors, but they also pool together a larger quantity and quality of data to support strategic national, regional, and international advocacy in order to eradicate torture.

A younger program within IRCT is the Global Indicators Initiative. Launched in February of this year, the initiative seeks to develop national indicators on torture victims’ rights to rehabilitation. With workshops in Uganda and South Africa, this project seeks to enable members of IRCT to better guide their states and measure the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs. Ultimately, these indicators will become a tool used to inform governments and lead to more efficient ways to support torture survivors in rebuilding their lives.

Samuel Nsubuga, the Chief Executive Officer of IRCT member ACTV, provided commentary on how a national indicator system could improve support to torture victims in Uganda: “We have excellent laws that promise support to torture victims but in practice, the State does very little to make these promises reality. So, what we need is a framework for assessing these efforts that has the buy-in of both State agencies and civil society. Then, we can truly start to move forward on this important issue.”

IRCT and ACTV are currently working alongside national stakeholders to finalize the national indicator framework for human rights monitoring work. To learn more visit IRCT.

(Photos courtesy of IRCT)

About The Hilton Prize Coalition
The Hilton Prize Coalition is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the Fellows Program, the Collaborative Models Program and the Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

 

refugee woman walking through settlement

Refuge: Humanity & Inclusion

The Refuge series, a production of the Hilton Prize Coalition Storytelling Program, aims to chronicle how Coalition members are addressing the global refugee crisis. The first film in the four-part Refuge series features Humanity & Inclusion’s work to improve the lives of disabled Syrian refugees in Lebanon.

To see how Humanity & Inclusion impacts the lives of Syrian refugees, watch the first film in the series, Refuge: Humanity & Inclusion, and read the article below by Jeff Meer, the U.S. Executive Director of Humanity & Inclusion. In his reflection, Jeff overviews the gap in care for disabled refugees and explains how HI seeks to close that gap. 

 

Refugees and Disability
By Jeff Meer, U.S. Executive Director of Humanity & Inclusion

Jeff Meer, U.S. Executive Director of Humanity & Inclusion

I recently received an urgent message from a large provider of refugee relief services in a Middle East country.  “We have an urgent need in the Za’atari refugee camp,” the message read, “one of the refugees there needs to be fitted for an artificial leg, and we hope Humanity & Inclusion (HI) can help.”

This sort of request for assistance by HI is incredibly common.  Why?  The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that roughly 15 percent of people on earth (or one in seven of us) live with a disability.  At the same time, the total population of displaced individuals has climbed to the greatest number ever recorded, more than 65 million globally, according to the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR).

This means that the minimum number of persons with disabilities who are also displaced comes to nearly 9.8 million people, approximately the population of the Bay Area in California, and just slightly smaller than the population of Jakarta, Indonesia, one of the world’s largest cities.  But even this number is almost surely an undercount of the need.

In 2013, HI and HelpAge surveyed thousands of displaced Syrians living in Jordan and Lebanon, and calculated that at least 30 percent (almost double the WHO estimate) had a specific need related to a disability.  One in five displaced Syrians living in Jordan and Lebanon was affected by a physical, sensory or intellectual impairment; one in seven was affected by a chronic illness, and one in 20 suffered from a conflict injury.  Perhaps not surprising in such a population, almost half had problems accomplishing simple daily activities and were twice as likely as the general population to report signs of psychological issues from post-traumatic stress, an important and growing cause of disability.

If this were the case in every displacement, we would find that the global estimate of those living with a disability of some sort would be at least double the WHO disability estimate.  However, the fact is that we lack comprehensive statistics on the scope of this vast population.  Gathering statistics on disability in refugee and relief settings is not a priority and is therefore not done in many cases.

Even if we are not completely sure about the precise size of the disabled population in crises, why would organizations with well-developed capacity in emergency response find themselves without any capacity to do disability work?  Much of this has do to with a lack of technical knowledge and capacity.  There are just not that many organizations working in relief capable of offering the rehabilitation services needed to recover from an amputation, nor capable of fitting an artificial leg, and then ensuring that the person can learn to use the leg well. But part of the barrier is also related to stigma – even relief workers inured to difficult conditions and calamitous health issues can harbor unconscious biases about disability, preventing them from discovering the sometimes simple solutions to what can feel like complex needs.

HI, with its global mission and mandate, works in many conflict zones to ensure that the needs of individuals with disabilities are met.  But HI cannot be present everywhere, so the organization is establishing norms and protocols for other emergency response and relief organizations who come in contact with individuals with disabilities.

Among other recent initiatives, HI collaborated with other organizations to create a “Charter on the Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action.” HI has also worked collaboratively to create the “Minimum Standards for Age and Disability Inclusion in Humanitarian Action,” which was co-funded by DfID and USAID’s Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance.  HI also recently worked with UNICEF to create a series of guidebooks for those who work with children with disabilities in humanitarian settings.  This resource enables relief staff to conduct the vast majority of interventions when working among children with disabilities.

Much of HI and our partners’ work underlines a central point: assisting people with disabilities in refugee camps and humanitarian settings is not so different from helping other groups.  An essential first step is engaging people with disabilities in the planning and execution of assistance.  And making sure that those offering the assistance are confident that they can already meet many of the needs of those with disabilities.

Are we done?  Not by a long shot.  The calls keep coming, and HI keeps responding.  We do this on our own, sometimes in collaboration, and always with the needs of the people with disabilities foremost.  I am delighted to report that even before I received the email from Jordan, HI staff had already visited the individual in the refugee camp and had measured him for a new leg.  By the time you read this, he will be well on the way toward his new life, standing tall once again.

 

About The Hilton Prize Coalition
The Hilton Prize Coalition is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the Fellows Program, the Collaborative Models Program and the Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Group of people

HPC Fellow: Sarah Allen, BRAC USA

Sarah Allen is a current Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow with  BRAC, the largest development organization in the world, which is devoted to empowering people living in poverty. In her blog, Sarah reflects on World Refugee Day, June 20, and the work BRAC is doing to ease the plight of the Rohingya people who fled Myanmar to seek shelter in makeshift settlements in Bangladesh. 

Fellowship Reflections for World Refugee Day
By Sarah Allen

I first encountered BRAC during an introduction to international development course in college, where my professor praised it for its dedication to scientific rigor, business acumen, and global south-led solutions. Subsequently, BRAC’s name continued to pop up in my life in various subtle ways: I found it in a textbook; I stumbled upon it in an article in the The Economist.

Only days after I made a cross-country move to New York City, I read an article in The New York Times citing BRAC as one of the key organizations responding to a devastating humanitarian crisis that was, at the time, just beginning to rapidly escalate. As the Myanmar government began a violent new crackdown against the Rohingya, an ethnic minority group residing in its Rakhine State, hundreds of thousands of Rohingya fled over the border and into Bangladesh, where BRAC had been working for over four decades.

I was fascinated by BRAC, but I never imagined that I would one day have the chance to work for the organization. So when I was presented with the opportunity to complete a fellowship with BRAC USA, I jumped at the chance.

Now, as a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow at BRAC USA, I support BRAC’s work to create opportunities for people around the world by raising awareness and mobilizing resources to support its programs. Working on both the Communications and Business Development teams, I play a joint role and complete projects that range from developing social media content and writing press releases to conducting prospect research on potential funders and supporting relationship management with institutional donors.

But throughout all of these varied projects, my time at BRAC USA has been marked by the Rohingya humanitarian crisis. It’s something that permeates my work every day, whether I am identifying prospective donors who might support our response efforts, conducting digital marketing campaigns to raise awareness about the crisis, or reporting to donors on the latest updates from the field.

Woman and baby

Tahera with her newborn son

As World Refugee Day approaches on June 20th, I have begun to reflect on my time as a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow, and in particular, how my work has intersected with displaced people around the world. A big aspect of my job is storytelling – communicating the stories of those BRAC serves to our donors, partners, followers, and friends. I come across stories from Cox’s Bazar, the border region of Bangladesh that is now home to over a million displaced Rohingya people living in makeshift settlements, on a daily basis. Recently, the story of a new mother struck me.

Tahera was pregnant with her first child when government forces in Myanmar targeted her community, killing families and burning down homes. Her home was burnt to the ground, forcing her to flee on foot. She ran for two weeks through jungles, mountains, and across the sea before finally arriving in a makeshift settlement in Cox’s Bazar where she gave birth to a healthy baby boy at a BRAC delivery center. Tahera says that her baby traveled more before he was born than she expected him to in his lifetime.

When I learn of stories like Tahera’s, I feel incredibly lucky to play a role, albeit a small one, in supporting families like hers who have been forced out of their homes. And thanks to my time as a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow at BRAC USA, I have been inspired to continue this work – in fact, following my fellowship, I will join BRAC USA full time as a Communications Associate. In my new role, I will continue to tell the stories of resilient women like Tahera to mobilize awareness and resources to support the programs that are helping families like hers.

I have deeply enjoyed my time as a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow, and I have gained so much more than I could have imagined from my time working with BRAC USA. I am grateful for the investment that both Hilton Prize Coalition and BRAC USA have made in me from the beginning, and I am so excited to continue to learn and grow as I transition forward.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition
The Hilton Prize Coalition is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the Fellows Program, the Collaborative Models Program and the Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

daisy in wall

International Day for the Elimination of Sexual Violence in Conflict

In 2015, the United Nations General Assembly declared June 19 the International Day for the Elimination of Sexual Violence in Conflict. The Hilton Prize Coalition joins in the effort to shed light on the plight of those suffering from sexual violence in conflict, and call for greater efforts in protection and prevention.

When used in the context of conflict, sexual violence serves as a military or political tactic to subjugate the opposing side. In a report from the UN, the term “conflict-related sexual violence” refers to “rape, sexual slavery, forced prostitution, forced pregnancy, forced abortion, enforced sterilization, forced marriage, and any other form of sexual violence of comparable gravity perpetrated against women, men, girls or boys that is directly or indirectly linked to a conflict.” The victims in conflict are targeted strategically from opposing ethnic, religious or political groups, reflecting a larger war or crisis.

The effects of sexual violence can have a lasting impact on its victims. Victims who are able to return to their homes may be outcastes from their society due to their contact with the enemy. As a result, it destroys families and communities. In the extreme, rape and forced sterilization could eradicate the next generation, an act tantamount to genocide.

The 2018 theme of International Day for the Elimination of Sexual Violence in Conflict draws attention to one of the effects of violence, “The Plight and Rights of Children Born of War.” The theme highlights the struggle of those born from rape, who often struggle with issues of identity and are seen as a child of the enemy. As outcastes of society, they become more susceptible to recruitment and radicalization by terrorist groups. By drawing attention to the struggles of these people, the UN hopes to foster solidarity with the survivors and their children and give them a voice to advocate for their rights.

Women for Women International (WFWI), a member of the Hilton Prize Coalition, was founded to help survivors of sexual violence from conflict in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The organization works to promote the civil rights of women and girls and empowers them to build stronger communities. WFWI cites violence against women and girls as “one of the biggest global challenges in enabling women and girls to the full and equal enjoyment of their rights.” WFWI strives to change the social norms that tolerate violence towards women by educating both men and women on the rights of women and advocating for services for those who are victims.

In 2016, the UN passed a resolution that allows for greater cooperation in systematic monitoring and information-sharing to deter the transnational trafficking of persons. The resolution also affirmed sexual violence as an act of terrorism, calling for global action to prevent sexual violence from being used as a tool in recruitment and radicalization. By holding perpetrators accountable, states can deter future crimes of sexual violence.

For additional information, visit the United Nations International Day for the Elimination of Sexual Violence in Conflict resource page.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition
The Hilton Prize Coalition is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the Fellows Program, the Collaborative Models Program and the Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Coalition Member Spotlight: HelpAge

For Elder Abuse Awareness Day on June 15, the Hilton Prize Coalition shines a spotlight on Laureate member HelpAge. HelpAge USA is the U.S. affiliate of HelpAge International, a global non-profit dedicated to advancing the wellbeing and inclusion of older people. Through a global network of over 120 partners and affiliates in over 70 countries, HelpAge implements programs and policies that improve the health and livelihoods of older people in poor communities. From getting the rights of older people recognized in global, multilateral agreements to improving healthcare access in small villages, HelpAge works at all levels to ensure everyone who reaches old age can live a healthy, safe, and secure life. HelpAge is the 2012 recipient of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize .

As life expectancy continues to increase in both developed and developing regions, there is a greater need for societies to address elder abuse and neglect. But despite the growing population of older people, awareness of elder abuse remains low. Cultural conceptions of violence and abuse tend to portray victims as young or middle-aged even though 20% of the world’s population is expected to be over the age of 60 by 2050. Older people may not report abuse because of the social stigma attached to it, a stigma that HelpAge works to alleviate as it fights elder discrimination.

Vietnam self help club in Nghe An Province

A HelpAge study on older adults in protracted humanitarian crises found that 1 in 5 had experienced some form of violence. A study in five EU countries found that 28% of women 60 years of age and older reported experiencing some form of abuse in the previous year. This statistic included sexual and physical violence as well as other forms of abuse. The most common perpetrator of this violence is a spouse or intimate partner.

More can be done by governments and multilateral organizations to include older people in human rights protections. Of the 133 countries surveyed in the World Health Organization’s 2014 Violence Prevention survey, only 59% said they have laws to prevent elder abuse, and only 30% said that these were fully enforced.  Existing international human rights laws do not explicitly articulate protecting older women from violence.

To combat age discrimination at the grassroots level, HelpAge developed a campaign called Age Demands Action (ADA). ADA mobilizes local communities to advocate for the rights of older people. The 9th United Nations Open-Ended Working Group on Aging will take place in July at the UN headquarters in New York. HelpAge’s ADA campaigners will advocate for four key areas of rights. These are the rights to autonomy and independence; long-term care and palliative care; equality and non-discrimination; and freedom from violence, abuse, and neglect.

For more information on how HelpAge supports World Elder Abuse Awareness Day and advocates for a UN convention, read this article. To learn more about HelpAge’s health and humanitarian programs, visit their website at www.helpageusa.org

(Photos courtesy of HelpAge USA)

About The Hilton Prize Coalition
The Hilton Prize Coalition is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the Fellows Program, the Collaborative Models Program and the Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

People with hands raised in a circle

Collaborative Models: Trauma Informed Care Curriculum

Cultivando: La ResilienciaThe Hilton Prize Coalition, in conjunction with members Casa Alianza (the Latin American arm of Covenant House International) and IRCT (the International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims), is proud to announce the release of the Trauma Informed Care Curriculum.

The Trauma Informed Care Curriculum, “Cultivando La Resiliencia,” or “Cultivating Resilience,” is the product of a collaborative effort within the Coalition’s Collaborative Models Program and consists of six training modules, a facilitator’s guide, pre-training questionnaire, and supplementary materials.  Together, the modules and supporting documents provide comprehensive evidence-based guidance for direct service workers working with youth affected by trauma in Latin America. The Curriculum was developed to be culturally contextualized, and as such, is available in Spanish only.

To learn more about the Curriculum and to see a brief description of each of the six training modules, visit the Trauma Informed Care Curriculum page.

(Photo courtesy of Casa Alianza/Covenant House)

About The Hilton Prize Coalition
The Hilton Prize Coalition is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the Fellows Program, the Collaborative Models Program and the Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

BRAC volunteers walking in field

Coalition Member Spotlight: BRAC

The Hilton Prize Coalition shines a spotlight on the 2008 Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize winner, BRAC Since 1972, BRAC has improved lives around the world by empowering communities to better utilize their human and material resources to lift themselves out of poverty. Founded in a remote village in Bangladesh, BRAC has grown into one of the largest development organization in the world. BRAC reaches an estimated 120 million people in eleven countries in Asia and Africa.

Since August 2017, over 693,000 Rohingyas were forcibly-displaced from Myanmar, contributing to the world’s fastest growing humanitarian crisis. Many Rohingyas settled in Cox’s Bazar, an area in Bangladesh where BRAC has been active for over 35 years. BRAC works with this displaced population to meet their immediate needs and establish solutions for their continued care, providing shelter, nutrition, basic healthcare, as well as education.  

BRAC produced a series of videos showing relief efforts that are improving the living conditions of the Rohingyas. Each video provides a glimpse at life in the settlements and how families are coping with the conditions. Many of the videos highlight volunteers who are positively impacting their communities by caring for the wellbeing of their neighbors.   

refugees in line for supplies How are Rohingya makeshift settlements managed? 
In order to manage the settlements, national and international agencies, NGOs, representatives from the government, and the people living in the settlements come together to discuss challenges facing the community. Together, they work to find innovative ways to provide a decent quality of life, including access to food, water, shelter, and health services. Adding to the problems of the settlements, cyclone and monsoon season is approaching, so they are working to prepare for the impending natural disasters.  

WATCH THE VIDEO

 

women talking outside a refugee tentMobilizing strength and knowledge  
BRAC has trained 800 Rohingya Community Mobilization Volunteers at the Kutupalong Refugee Camp. As a volunteer, Jamalida goes door-to-door to check in on members of her community. She teaches them good health and hygiene practices as well as disaster preparedness. Diseases spread fast in close quarters, and volunteers like Jamalida are important in identifying and treating illnesses before they can spread.  

WATCH THE VIDEO

 

Children in refugee school What learning looks likes in the midst of a humanitarian crisis
In November 2017, BRAC signed an agreement with UNICEF to implement early learning and non-formal basic education centers for the forcibly-displaced children. Since then, BRAC has built 200 temporary learning centers that offer classes 6 days a week in 2-hour sessions. Children learn to read and write in English with local teachers and in Burmese with instructors from their own community who share their heritage.  

WATCH THE VIDEO

 

Lighting up hearts in the middle of a humanitarian crisis 
Laughter is important for all ages, but in a refugee settlement, it can be difficult to come by. When a group of humanitarian clowns visited Cox’s Bazar, they provided much need relief to the people living there. Encouraging laughter, beauty, and art in the communities is crucial to mental health. The troupe of clowns brought the people of the settlement together to share in a communal joy in an otherwise bleak place.  

WATCH THE VIDEO

 

BRAC’s initiatives in social development and social enterprises provide pathways for disadvantaged people to take control of their future. As a member of the Hilton Prize Coalition, BRAC was one of the six laureates featured in the film “On Shifting Ground.” The film centered recovering efforts following the 2015 earthquake in Nepal. BRAC continues to serve in the most vulnerable regions of the world, helping people come together to build stronger, more just societies.   

(Photos courtesy of BRAC)

About The Hilton Prize Coalition
The Hilton Prize Coalition is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the Fellows Program, the Collaborative Models Program and the Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Four women hold supportive signs

HPC Fellow: Sara Owens, HelpAge USA

Sara Owens is a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow with HelpAge USA in Washington, D.C. HelpAge International is a global network of organizations promoting the right of all older people to lead dignified, healthy and secure lives. As the programs and marketing fellow, Sara assists in building partnerships with corporations and foundations, and supports the staff on special projects such as HelpAge’s Gender-Based Violence study and the ADCAP program.

The Importance of Including Older Women in Humanitarian Response
By Sara Owens

When I began to envision my career, I knew I wanted to work in the humanitarian sector, and I could clearly feel a passion to promote gender equality and rights for women in my own community and around the world. What I didn’t know until I started my fellowship at HelpAge, is just how powerful and necessary gender equality is within humanitarian programming.

HelpAge focuses on improving the lives of older people and their families so they can lead dignified, healthy, and secure lives. HelpAge works to ensure older people have access to better health services, pensions, income generating activities, and more appropriate emergency responses. One of the great things about HelpAge is that the staff here have challenged me to think outside the box when it comes to age and gender inclusive humanitarian response programs.

Whether it’s accessing basic healthcare or remaining safe in situations of displacement and emergencies, I have learned a great deal about the challenges older women face. A big problem in delivering humanitarian aid to older women is that there is almost no data gathered on this demographic. People above the age of 50 are routinely excluded from policy, research, and programming regarding gender-based violence in humanitarian settings. This lack of data often leads to issues in accessing aid, or even women’s exclusion from these aid programs. Simply put, humanitarian actors find it difficult to justify resource allocation for a group that they know nothing about.

According to a study done by HelpAge, gender-based violence (GBV) and intimate partner violence are exacerbated in humanitarian emergencies [1], so in addition to problems with accessing aid in emergencies women and older women experience increased levels of violence in situations of displacement. Following these major emergencies and epidemics, older women are also relied upon to become caretakers.

family members sitting on bench

Theresa (55), four of her grandchildren, and Theresa’s grandmother (95).

As part of my fellowship, I routinely drafted emails to our donors. One email detailed how an older woman in Western Africa was affected by the Ebola epidemic. Although she didn’t contract Ebola herself, both her daughter and son-in-law died as a result, leaving her to raise six grandchildren. Her story is only one of many happening all over the world. In fact, HelpAge estimates that half of the children orphaned by HIV/AIDS are being brought up by a grandparent, and usually the grandmother.

The WHO states that older women in these situations experience increased levels of violence and abuse from partners who are financially burdened by having to raise their grandchildren. [2] Due to these barriers, women, and specifically older women, face a difficult set of challenges when humanitarian emergencies arise.

Working with HelpAge has opened my eyes to the need to support underserved populations. HelpAge has also taught me that humanitarian responses should not be a one-size-fits-all approach because there are diverse needs in any population. Through delivering age-appropriate food, hygiene kits, healthcare, psycho-social support and other resources, HelpAge is the only international NGO dedicated to supporting older women and men in humanitarian settings.

In addition to learning about older women and humanitarian programming, I have also learned a great deal about the ins and outs of grant-making, fundraising, research, and communications strategies. A wonderful benefit of working with the smaller US office of this global organization is being able to observe and support the daily aspects of an NGO’s operations. Throughout the past few months working with HelpAge, I have grown on both a professional and personal level.

 

[1] Age is No Protection: Prevalence of gender-based violence among men and women over 49 years of age in five situations of protracted displacement. AAAS, 2017.
[2] Women, Ageing and Health: A Framework for Action. World Health Organization, 2007

(Photos courtesy of HelpAge)

About The Hilton Prize Coalition
The Hilton Prize Coalition is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the Fellows Program, the Collaborative Models Program and the Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

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