Fighting Lymphatic Filariasis: HPC Fellow Lynette Suiaunoa-Scanlan

Lynette Suiaunoa-Scanlan is a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow working with The Task Force for Global Health. At The Task Force, Lynette worked on a community-based post Lymphatic Filariasis mass drug administration Coverage Survey in American Samoa. Read on to learn about her time as a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow.

I first learned about Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows Program from a colleague who recommended me to the Task Force for Global Health. Instinctively, I applied without knowing what the position fully entailed. I was a recent MPH graduate who deeply desired an opportunity to exercise my newly acquired knowledge and set of skills. Upon receiving the great news, I humbly accepted the opportunity and immediately got involved. I was thrilled to be a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow in American Samoa “my home” after being away for so many years.

As a Fellow, I was assigned to assist the US Centers for Disease Control’s Center for Global Health (CDCCGH) and the Pacific Island Health Officers Association (PIHOA) to conduct a community-based post Lymphatic Filariasis mass drug administration (LF MDA) Coverage Survey in American Samoa. This coverage survey is a component of American Samoa Department of Health’s (ASDOH) Lymphatic Filariasis Prevention and Elimination Program, and in adherence to the World Health Organization’s Global Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis (LF) Strategy.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), American Samoa is the only area in the United States where LF is endemic. Surveys for LF conducted in 1999 demonstrated that American Samoa had some of the highest infection levels in the Pacific Region (Coutts et al., 2017). Despite the efforts to control and eliminate the disease from 2000-2015, results from a survey conducted in 2016 indicated widespread transmission across the territory (Sheel et al., 2018). There are recent actions to accomplish elimination and there is evidence that early treatment can reverse clinical impact. And because of this the government of American Samoa strengthened an obligation to eliminate LF in American Samoa by 2024.

During the coverage survey, I assisted as a supervisor/consultant for one of three teams. The survey consisted of 3 full days of training and 13 full days of field work.The field work was my favorite part of the fellowship. We went out to the randomly selected villages and utilized coverage survey sampling to identify households for inclusion in coverage interviews. The interviews were implemented primarily by asking consent approval, if yes, a brief questionnaire about the LF campaign and MDA would follow.

The team also stumbled upon challenges. Some challenges we had no control over such as the weather, this would often push us back. With perseverance and a deadline to meet the challenges and barriers in the end, transparency mended. Nonetheless, it was heartwarming to see the efforts of the collaboration of the American Samoa Department of Health, CDC and PIHOA flourish through the knowledge the citizens knew about lymphatic filariasis. This gave an optimistic sense of direction (at least for me) for the future endeavor of eliminating this silent parasitic disease.    

Although it was a time sensitive project and eventually came to an end, I was most enthusiastic about the opportunity to be a part of something meaningful that cultivated the general health of the people of American Samoa. As little or big as my role was, I was able to genuinely contribute my time and knowledge to work towards the continuous efforts to eliminate LF in American Samoa. My experience as a Fellow was very rewarding. I was given an opportunity to work with a wonderful team, and I’m forever grateful for the mentorship throughout the project.

Special thank you to the Task Force for Global Health and Hilton Prize Coalition for the once in a lifetime opportunity. This opportunity in it’s short time opened new doors for me to continue working in a field that I am passionate about.

(Photos courtesy of The Task Force for Global Health. Image features TFGH team that  traveled to Tau, Manu’a during the coverage survey)

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through its signature Fellows Program, the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact. 

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit
prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.


World Health Day: PATH Fellows Make a Difference

April 7 is World Health Day, a global health awareness day celebrated under the sponsorship of the World Health Organization. To commemorate World Health Day, we recognize all that PATH has done to improve the health of people around the world by advancing technologies, strengthening systems, and encouraging healthy behaviors.

To further PATH’s mission, the Hilton Prize Coalition has provided resources to staff four Fellows placements. Here are the Fellows who have made an impact at PATH and beyond.

Learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows Program and all our Fellows do.

FELLOWS SNAPSHOTS

Nikhila (Nikki) Kalra

Nikki worked on PATH’s Nutrition Innovation team. Blockchain and Digital Currency Fellow. She conducted field research into food value chains in support of maternal and child nutrition programs in Ghana and Senegal .

Chytanya Kompala

On the Nutrition Innovation team at PATH, Chytanya conducted a systematic review on the determinants of stunting. She also wrote policy briefs on nutrition-sensitive risk factors of stunting.

Catherine May

Also serving on the Nutrition Innovation team at PATH, Catherine advanced a PATH collaboration with Heifer International to leverage the collective knowledge of both organizations into more effective interventions in food systems and human health.

Amy Roll

Amy works with PATH’s Nutrition Innovation Team on data-driven reports on cookstoves. She also supported PATH, The Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves, and The Bridge Collaborative in bringing together expertise across the health, environment, and development disciplines to develop recommendations for clean fuel and improved cookstove research and programs.

About the Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Taking a Stand to End Human Trafficking: HPC Fellow Alma Vazquez

Alma Vazquez is a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow working with Covenant House. At Covenant House, Alma advocated for survivors of human trafficking. In her blog, she reflects upon the impact of advocacy work.

In my time as a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow with Covenant House, my experience has been life changing. I’ve been able to learn and help many to understand the true reality of human trafficking. Many are blind to the idea that human trafficking is an escalating and very serious issue. It’s an issue that’s happening right under their noses.

By educating people about what human trafficking really is and ways to prevent it, it opens up one’s mind to really look out for red flags and ultimately try to make some sort of change on this continuing reality.

Red flags to look out for include:

  • Seeing a young female with an older guy
  • Seeing young girls on the block trying to prostitute themselves
  • Seeing young women frequently monitored and not in control of their own money, financial records, or bank account

The list goes on and on.

The reality is that many girls are too afraid to speak out because they feel nobody will believe them. Many girls fear they will be judged. They fear that someone will say they are just seeking attention. Because of these reasons, advocating for girls who are survivors of human trafficking really made me change the way I see and interpret this world. I knew that all it took was one voice. One voice that could potentially save the life of another young woman or man.

We also have to keep in mind that men can get lured into human trafficking. When a survivor speaks up about their experience and what they had to go through, it is no easy task. Male victims of human trafficking face an additional stigma.

Over the course of this fellowship, I learned that being an advocate for survivors helps create a cycle for many young girls to be able to open up about their experiences. By opening up, they are able to bring change into the way society views human trafficking.

During my fellowship, I had the opportunity to attend many Anti-Human Trafficking Coalition meetings. From attending these meetings, I learned that there is a full community working on bettering and bringing safety to many girls that have experienced human trafficking. Being part of their team has really been an amazing experience, and I have learned so much from attending meetings and meeting very important people from many different organizations such as Safe Horizon, Restore, Sanctuary for Families and so many more.

Knowing that I am able to have a voice for many of these girls really warms my heart because as a survivor I know what it feels like to think that nobody out there cares. Overall, when a survivor feels like someone does care and wants a better life for them, it ultimately changes their perspective of life and it gives them a sense of wanting a better future for themselves.

I will continue to work and be a part of the many opportunities provided to end human trafficking.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

World Water Day: Amref Health Africa’s Impact

March 22 marks World Water Day, a day that highlights the importance of freshwater. This United Nations observance day is used to advocate for the sustainable management of freshwater resources, and the 2019 theme is leaving no one behind. To achieve Sustainable Development Goal 6, every country needs to ensure the availability and sustainable management of water for all by 2030.

Amref Health Africa is one Hilton Prize Coalition member who understands the importance of access to clean water within its strategic pillars. Amref’s mission is to increase sustainable health access to communities in Africa through solutions in human resources for health, health services delivery, and investments in health.

For World Water Day, Amref shared the story of Bandacho Primary in Kenya.

“Where hope should have died, Amref keeps the embers glowing. Where thirsty children fantasize about a drink of fresh water – something so basic, we just do not stand by and watch them suffer.”

Go to Amref’s blog to get the full story on how Amref Health Africa ensures children have more than 300ml of water to drink per day at school.

International Women’s Day: Women for Women International’s Fellows Make a Difference

March 8 was Internal Women’s Day, a day of recognizing women for their achievements without regard to divisions, whether national, ethnic, linguistic, cultural, economic or political.

To commemorate International Women’s Day, we recognize all that Women for Women International has done to advance social and economic empowerment for women. Women for Women International supports the most marginalized women in countries affected by conflict and war. Their programs enable women to earn and save money, improve health and well-being, influence decisions in their home and community, and connect to networks for support. By utilizing skills, knowledge, and resources, women are able to create sustainable change for themselves, their family, and community.

To further Women for Women’s mission, the Hilton Prize Coalition has provided resources to staff two Fellows placements. Here are the Fellows who have made an impact at Women for Women International and beyond.

Learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows Program and all our Fellows do.

FELLOWS SNAPSHOTS

Desiree Dickerson

Desiree served as Women for Women International’s Blockchain and Digital Currency Fellow. She explored how blockchain and distributed ledger technology, as well as other emerging technologies, could aid Women for Women International in its mission to empower women in marginalized countries affected by war and conflict.

Rounida Shwaish

Rounida worked with the organization’s Human Resources department to conduct research related to capacity building and learning management systems. At the start of her fellowship, she traveled to the Women for Women office in Kosovo to participate in organization’s global HR retreat during which she presented on implementing a learning management system.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

(Photos courtesy of Women for Women International)



Compassionate Care: HPC Fellow Maria Colimão

Maria Colimão is a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow working with St Christopher’s Hospice. At St Christopher’s Hospice, Maria worked closely with the Compassionate Neighbours program on outreach, home visits, and trainings for the community on compassionate care. In her blog, Maria reflects upon her time at St Christopher’s Hospice.

Compassionate Neighbours are a growing network of people who support each other to promote compassion in their communities. They provide social and emotional support to people around them living with or caring for someone with a life limiting illness or those experiencing loneliness or social isolation by visiting regularly, offering friendship, emotional support and a listening ear; helping people continue doing things they love; helping people stay connected to the community, family and friends.

To make this network spread, I’ve worked with three dimensions of the program: outreach, home and matching visits, and training.

1. Outreach

In the outreach dimension, I had the opportunity to engage with organizations in London’s Croydon community. On December 4, 2018, I engaged with a group of 45 Muslim women in Elmwood, a community within Croydon. I presented the Compassionate Neighbours project and offered them the opportunity to join our network.

On January 5, 2019 through a connection with Norbury Green Residents Association, we had the chance to link with the local Counselor Shafi Khan. We shared our Compassionate Neighbours program and ran the event alongside another St Christopher’s Hospice project called Creative Conversations.

After the event, the Norbury Green Residents Association advertised our project in their newsletter, and a national organization contacted us to know more about the project. They were willing to join. This moment taught me the power of collaboration.

2. Home and Matching Visits

The home and matching visits have been my main focus since January and it’s an amazing opportunity and privilege to meet and connect with amazing people.

Through this experience, I’ve learned that the world is so small. In February, I matched two ladies who already knew each other. Once, they both were caring for their husbands and attended a carer support group.  They only realized that connection when they saw each other after I matched them. Our aim is to connect local people, so it’s a big win when that goal is achieved!

3. Trainings

The trainings are an opportunity to know more interesting people and have an idea of how to match them. It’s an educational part of the project that I love especially as we talk about death and dying. For some people, this is the first time they start to build the awareness concerning these issues.

As my time at St Christopher’s Hospice as a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow comes to a close, I am thankful for all of the connections I have been able to make for myself and the community around me.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

(Photos courtesy St Christopher’s Hospice)

World Day of Social Justice: BRAC Fellows Make a Difference

February 20 is World Day of Social Justice. Social justice is necessary for all communities to have equal access to peace and opportunity. Social justice seeks to remove barriers that people face because of gender, age, race, ethnicity, religion, culture or disability.

For World Day of Social Justice, we recognize all that Hilton Prize Coalition member BRAC has done to advance social justice. Since 1972, BRAC has improved lives around the world by empowering communities to better utilize their human and material resources to lift themselves out of poverty. Founded in a remote village in Bangladesh, BRAC has grown into one of the largest development organizations in the world.

To further BRAC’s mission, the Hilton Prize Coalition has provided resources to staff four Fellows placements at BRAC. The Fellows’ projects ranged from digital marketing campaigns to new revenue generating strategies. Here are the Fellows who have made an impact at BRAC and beyond.

Learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows Program and all our Fellows do.

FELLOWS SNAPSHOTS

Sarah Allen

Sarah supported BRAC USA’s work to create opportunities for people around the world by raising awareness and mobilizing resources to support its programs. Working on both the Communications and Business Development teams, Sarah played a joint role and completed projects that ranged from developing social media content and writing press releases to conducting prospect research on potential funders and supporting relationship management with institutional donors.

But throughout all of these varied projects, Sarah’s time at BRAC USA was marked by the Rohingya humanitarian crisis. It’s something that permeated every day, whether she was identifying prospective donors to support response efforts, conducting digital marketing campaigns to raise awareness about the crisis, or reporting to donors on the latest updates from the field.

Hrithik Bansal

Hrithik worked with the senior leadership of BRAC USA to develop and implement strategies towards new revenue-generating activities. To help Bangladeshi citizens solve land-related issues, the BRAC Human Rights and Legal Services program had initiated a land service enterprise, complementing its existing work in this arena advocating for the poor and underserved.

For Hrithik, finding a business case that balanced the social aspects of the enterprise against the financial viability of the firm was deeply enriching, and one that leveraged his unique skill set and experience.

Mia Perez

At BRAC USA, Mia worked on BRAC’s Play Lab project and the Learning, Empowerment, and Adolescent Development (LEAD) team in support of BRAC’s education and girls’ empowerment programs in Africa and Asia.

The Play Lab model ensures children are able to reclaim their right to quality education. Mia worked on the BRAC Play Lab Toolkit, which equipped BRAC’s partners, governments, and international early childhood development stakeholders with the tools to learn from, adopt, and contextualize the BRAC Play Lab model at scale.

Sheetal Tuladhar

Within a week of the 2015 Nepal earthquake, Sheetal received a call from BRAC USA to go to Nepal to help set up BRAC International’s newest office in Kathmandu as a Fellow. As unfortunate as the earthquakes had been, they gave Sheetal an opportunity to go back home and to make a difference.

As a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow, Sheetal had the opportunity to enhance her skills as a development practitioner in disaster resilience, learning first-hand how organizations working closely with local communities can strengthen their own capacities to build the resilience of their beneficiaries.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

(Photos courtesy BRAC USA)

Creating a Successful Fellowship Program

Jack Yatsko, Chief Operating Officer of Clubhouse International, talks about his experience building out a successful fellowship program in partnership with the Hilton Prize Coalition. Clubhouse International ensured they had the right goals and objectives for the fellowship in place to ensure their Fellow had the tools and resources to embark on opening the first Clubhouse in Mongolia. Learn the steps and tips for creating a fellowship that’s a win-win-win for all parties involved.

Creating a Win-Win-Win Fellowship Experience
Jack Yatsko

As a grateful recipient of the Hilton Humanitarian Prize in 2014, Clubhouse International is making a positive impact in 32 countries across the globe. Clubhouse International is the coordinating center for approximately 300 Clubhouses which are psychiatric rehabilitation programs providing a wide range of support for adults who have experienced a mental illness. The Clubhouse Model of Psychiatric Rehabilitation has proven to be a very successful, innovative model, and we steadily receive requests from individuals seeking to develop a Clubhouse in their communities.

The Fellowship Program provided through the Hilton Prize Coalition was a natural match for Clubhouse International to creatively develop a program to assist an individual from Mongolia to start a Clubhouse in her community.

We had received an email from Oyuntugs Bayaraa (Oyut), who was seeking information in how to start a Clubhouse in her home country of Mongolia. She was obtaining a graduate degree from the University of Arkansas at the time and planning to return to Mongolia upon graduation.

Given we have an International Training Base, Gateway, located in Greenville, South Carolina,   we talked to the Hilton Prize Coalition, Oyut, her Academic Advisor, and Gateway about combining the expertise of one of our International Training Bases and providing an immersion training experience. Clubhouse International would then provide specific support to assist Oyut to achieve her goal of starting a Clubhouse in Mongolia.

A unique element to this fellowship is that Oyut is legally blind. Despite having this challenge, Oyut was a determined Fellow and we all agreed to create an environment that Oyut could participate equally with other colleagues in her experience

To ensure a successful fellowship experience, we developed and objectives of the fellowship position with timelines and action steps. We created a blueprint for a win-win-win between Oyut, Clubhouse, and the Hilton Prize Coalition.

The steps included:

1. Designing an initial six-week curriculum

We aimed to give Oyut hands-on experience and tools to bring back to Mongolia to start a Clubhouse. The remaining six weeks of the placement would occur via long distance training so that Oyut could put concepts into practice in her local community.

2. Participating in an orientation program

At The Carriage House in Fort Wayne, Indiana, Oyut attended trainings and visited three area Clubhouses and learned basic concepts about the Clubhouse Model.

3. Attending a two-week Comprehensive Clubhouse Training Program at Gateway

During this training, Oyut lived in a guesthouse with other colleagues from various Clubhouses. She was involved in the work-ordered day at Gateway as well as numerous discussions about the philosophy and practices used in Clubhouses to assist adults with mental illness with their recovery goals

4. Joining an intensive two-day New Clubhouse Development Training

Clubhouse International facilitated this training with groups from six other states. During the training, Oyut developed a detailed action plan, which she now is in the process of implementing in Mongolia.

This experience proved to be a win-win-win experience for all parties:

1. Oyut won because she gained valuable experience and knowledge to give her the tools to start a Clubhouse.

2. Fellow Clubhouses and Clubhouse colleagues won because they learned from Oyut and her unique vantage points. Colleagues learned about her culture and some of the unique challenges she faced in trying to start a first-of-its kind Clubhouse in a country that has never had this kind of model.

3. Clubhouse International won by living out their mission. Clubhouse International seeks to help as many communities as we can to have a Clubhouse in their community. This fellowship offered a unique, creative opportunity to do so.

Oyut is now well on her way in starting a Board of Directors, obtaining an NGO to raise funds to start her Clubhouse and looking for other key supporters.

Ensuring a fellowship placement is successful is no small task. Here are some tips we learned along the way:

1. Develop a detailed Concept paper: Work closely with Hilton Prize Coalition in the design phase. The team was invaluable in sharing their expertise and experience.

2. Gather partners: We had enthusiastic support from The Carriage House, Gateway and others in being a part of an exciting new opportunity to start a Clubhouse in a country where we have no current Clubhouses.

3. Use technology to communicate effectively: We used Zoom frequently to have weekly meetings. Our global distance, whether it was when Oyut was in Arkansas, Indiana, South Carolina, or Mongolia was not a barrier due to today’s technology. I am based in Hawaii and was so happy to finally meet Oyut in South Carolina, but we felt like we already knew each other from prior video conferences.

4. Don’t be afraid of challenges or perceived barriers: We had to deal with visa issues, bringing in University partners, and several clubhouses to make all of this work and we did! Oyut was also very candid about her visual challenges and we were able to still make the fellowship work successfully.

We would like to thank the Hilton Prize Coalition for their support of the Fellows Program. We hope to announce the opening the first Clubhouse in Mongolia soon!

International Day of Zero Tolerance for FGM: Tostan Fellows Make a Difference

February 6 is International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation, a day of raising awareness to eradicate female genital mutilation. Female genital mutilation (FGM) comprises all procedures that involve altering or injuring the female genitalia for non-medical reasons and is recognized internationally as a violation of the human rights of girls and women.

For International Day of Zero Tolerance for FGM, we recognize all that Tostan has done to contribute to the abandonment of FGM. Tostan’s empowerment of women at the local level and  holistic partnership approaches have resonated with governments, civil society, community leaders, and the world’s most vulnerable populations. Hilton Prize Coalition member Tostan is an NGO that empowers African communities to bring about sustainable development and positive social transformation based on respect for human rights.

To further Tostan’s mission, the Hilton Prize Coalition has provided resources to staff two Fellows placements at Tostan. Here are the Fellows who have made an impact at Tostan and beyond.

Learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition Fellows Program and all our Fellows do.

Fellows Snapshots

Hannelore Van Bavel

Hannelore worked with Tostan to evaluate the organization’s impact on the practice of female genital cutting. Unlike many other organizations, Tostan does not focus on FGC as a single issue to tackle, but supports wider community empowerment through education. The organization encourages communities to envision their ideal future and believes that they have the capacity to reach their self-defined goals. Rather than coercing communities to give up FGC, they empower communities through education and create opportunities for dialogue about FGC and other issues.

Learn more about Hannelore’s experience and Tostan’s approach in her blog.

Rita Kumar

Rita worked with Tostan to develop a knowledge management system that will allow new team members to reduce their ramp up time, capture more learnings of long term staff, and help Tostan scale their learning using some newer channels. 90% of an organizational institution remains uncaptured, and that knowledge leaves the organization when staff either retire or leave the organization. It is important for an organization to think about what knowledge needs to be captured, how to capture it, maintain it, and share it.  Knowledge is only truly useful if it results in action or other solutions. 

Learn more about Rita’s experience and how she identified knowledge management gaps and opportunities in her blog.

(Photos courtesy of Tostan)

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the 23 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Humanitarian Sector Collaboration: Stories of Trainings, Wellbeing, and Landscape Analysis

The Hilton Prize Coalition’s Collaborative Models Program leverages the rich base of talent, assets, experience, and insight from its growing membership, as each Coalition member is able to achieve more collectively than it could individually. 

This year, the Coalition launched five new projects that involve nine organizations. These projects include surgical trainings in Rwanda, a study on the wellbeing of aid workers, disaster risk reduction trainings in Myanmar, a needs assessment of communities in Liberia concerning the protection of land rights, and a collaborative storytelling project on the need for equitable access to treatment for non-communicable diseases.

Here are three of their stories.

Surgeon Training in Rwanda

Co-Lead Organizations: Operation Smile and Partners in Health

Together, Operation Smile and Partners in Health were able to build surgical capacity by providing training for general and plastic surgery residents for a selected cohort of trainees. Addressing the lack of reconstructive plastic surgeons in Rwanda, Operation Smile, in conjunction with the University of Rwanda, formalized a three-week surgical rotation template, identified target trainees, and began putting curriculum in place for plastic surgery residents, general surgery residents, anesthesia residents, nurses and hospital staff.

Humanitarian Wellbeing Project

Co-Lead Organizations: Heifer International and The Task Force for Global Health

In the spring of 2018, The Task Force for Global Health and Heifer International were awarded a Collaborative Models grant from the Hilton Prize Coalition for their Humanitarian Wellbeing Project. This project had its origins in the recognition that the stresses inherent in humanitarian work in settings of human deprivation, suffering, and trauma can lead to burnout, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Such experiences can negatively impact employee wellbeing, and in turn, limit the effectiveness of humanitarian organizations.

Landscape Analysis and Collaboration Assessment

Co-Lead Organizations: BRAC and Landesa

Around the world, land and agriculture are intrinsically linked. In Liberia approximately half of the population lives in rural areas and land and agriculture are a primary source of employment and income. In 2018, the legislature passed the long-awaited Land Rights Bill indicating Liberia is set to embark on an ambitious and robust land reform effort. As the country looks to further empower its farmers, taking a comprehensive approach to integrating land rights and agriculture could be a timely and powerful opportunity. Together, BRAC and Landesa created a program to assess the landscape of Bong County, Liberia. The resulting program report will include findings and recommendations on delivery mechanisms for closing the gaps on land rights. 

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The  Hilton Prize Coalition  is an independent alliance of the winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the  Fellows Program, the  Collaborative Models Program  and the  Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat,  Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit  prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact  prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow  the Hilton Prize Coalition on  Twitter and  LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

(Photos courtesy Operation Smile)

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