four women outside the US Capitol

HPC Fellow: Shanifa Bennett, Covenant House

Shanifa Bennett is a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow with Covenant House New York (CHNY), an organization that helps transform and save the lives of homeless, runaway and trafficked young people by offering housing and support services to young people in need. During her fellowship, Shanifa develops and facilitates workshops and training for CHNY staff and youth on how to recognize the signs of human trafficking and what steps to take once recognized. 

Standing Strong in the Fight Against Human Trafficking
by Shanifa Bennett

My time as a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow with Covenant House has been extremely rewarding. Since September of 2017, I have had the pleasure to work with a group of amazing youths who are eager to learn about the commercial exploitation of children and how to prevent it in their communities. Currently, I am a mentor at G.E.M.S (Girls Education Mentoring Services) and a Peer Educator at Legal Momentum. These two programs allow me to educate and bring awareness about the tragic and surprisingly local issue of human trafficking.

Trafficking is one of the toughest topics to speak about because of how uncomfortable and sensitive it is. Most people affiliate trafficking with something that happens overseas and do not realize that it actually happens much closer to home than they think. Red flags to watch out for in communities include seeing a child with an older male or children appearing malnourished and continuously standing at store corners. Talking to the population who is most often affected by trafficking is key to addressing the issue.

Our youth can take action in the fight against human trafficking if they are aware of the problem. As an advocate for ending the practice of sex trafficking, I develop workshops that give people a sense of what sex trafficking is as well as educational resources and ways to become more engaged in their communities to prevent it from happening.

I demonstrate my passion to stop human trafficking by spreading awareness and giving victims of sex trafficking a platform to tell their story and not feel ashamed. Through my work, I have had numerous opportunities to speak out against the issue, such as going to Washington, D.C. for the Rights Now Sex Trafficking Lobby Day. Nearly 150 people were there, including survivors and advocates, who explained to U.S. representatives why survivors need more protection and better services in the U.S. court system. Due to our hard work on Lobby Day, SESTA (Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act) passed on March 28, 2018.

At the Traffick Free NYC “Celebrating Survivors” breakfast, I was presented with an award. As a survivor myself, joining other survivors across New York City, I was amazed by how many advocates and survivors were acknowledged for their fight against human trafficking. Hearing their testimonies was incredible.

Mentoring the girls at G.E.M.S is rewarding for me because they are comfortable talking about their stories and sharing their opinions. Even when a story may be intense or emotional, through sharing, the girls become more open to learning about each other’s struggles with being in “the life” or exiting it. These healthy platforms are essential for youth to gain the courage to speak up about what’s going on in their lives.

This year one of the mentees in the G.E.M.S program expressed that she was finally ready to leave “the life” and focus on obtaining her G.E.D so she could then go to college and become a social worker. G.E.M.S. provides a chance for everyone to have a voice, take charge of their life, and regain everything they lost during a dark time in their life. The majority of women that I talk to after they exit “the life” feel out of place in situations that many people may call normal. Things like getting a job, finishing school, applying for housing, or getting their important documents such as a birth certificate can be frustrating.

I serve as a vessel that guides these women towards the help and services they need. Whether I’m small talking or giving them a referral, it’s important for these teens to have someone taking the necessary steps to change their lives for the better. Healthy platforms like G.E.M.S are essential to youth, so they can have courage to speak up about what’s going on in their lives.

Opening up a conversation about human sex trafficking is not easy, but the more I get engaged in helping fight the issue, the easier it is for me to continue the fight and stand strong. I aspire to be a social worker dealing with foster kids and homeless youth, who are often the ones most vulnerable to trafficking. It would bring me joy to know that one day I will have helped a child stay safe and find a happy loving home.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition
The Hilton Prize Coalition is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the Fellows Program, the Collaborative Models Program and the Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

HPC Fellow: Adaiana Lima, ECPAT International

Adaiana Lima is currently completing a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellowship based in Bangkok, Thailand with ECPAT International, an organization which has been at the forefront of the fight against sexual exploitation of children for the past 25 years. Through her fellowship placement on the Research and Policy team, she assists in the production of legal research to advance the mission of ending sexual exploitation of children in all its manifestations. 

In this blog post, Adaiana reflects on the education and the experiences that help her make an impact on the rights of children internationally. 

Being Part of the Change
By Adaiana Lima

Growing up in Brazil, I witnessed socio-economic disparities from an early age. As with many young adults, I was aware of the economic and social disparities in my local community, and I wanted to promote social development; however, I did not know how to be part of the change. Like many young women in Brazil, I found it hard to have my voice heard and my views taken seriously by society.

With the aim of giving young people a voice and equipping them with the tools to shape a better world, I founded and served as a director of my city’s chapter of AIESEC, the world’s largest youth-led organization. As a Director of the Global Community Development Program, I led a diverse team of young people to build partnerships with key actors that sought to understand local economic and social problems. We then designed and implemented projects aimed at improving opportunities for youth. From here, I decided that my passion for empowering youth would guide my goal.

I was identified as a future leader by the Chevening Program, which awarded me with a scholarship to study an LLM in International Human Rights Law at Queen Mary University of London in the United Kingdom. After completing my LLM, I assisted some nonprofit organizations; however, it was through the Hilton Prize Coalition fellowship that I experienced the most meaningful experience in the field of children’s rights.

Based at ECPAT International, I conduct research on child protection laws and policies in a number of countries in Europe and Asia to assist ECPAT in their mission of ending sexual exploitation of children. I also produce country reports with a comprehensive baseline of information on all manifestations of sexual exploitation of children. These reports inform the drafting of alternative reports to the United Nations for the advancement of child rights at national level. Additionally, I am a member of ECPAT’s working group designed to build and develop a strategy to combat trafficking of children for sexual purposes.

Working in Bangkok, alongside an influential organization, in a multicultural environment, provided me with unparalleled access to best practices. I am confident these best practices will provide a strong foundation for my professional career, and I will be able to share them with my home country. This fellowship sharpened my knowledge in children’s rights whilst also giving me the opportunity to work with a high-impact organization. As a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow, I had access to and insight into the leading developers and influencers in my field, with whom I could collaborate to address children’s rights issues.

I am confident that my work experience as a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow will advance my competence and ability to deliver effective solutions throughout my career. After the fellowship, my immediate plan is to work with an international organization that promotes the rights of the child. My overall professional goal is to continue fighting child abuse and exploitation and working to reduce the striking number of children in vulnerable situations.

Step by step I am succeeding in my personal mission of being part of the change. Opportunities like the Hilton Prize Coalition Fellowship empower me, as a young woman, to pursue it. My experience taught me that if we want to engage young people in the change we want to see, we need to provide them with meaningful opportunities to live a shared responsibility for the world.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition
The Hilton Prize Coalition is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the Fellows Program, the Collaborative Models Program and the Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

“On Shifting Ground:” Three Years after the Nepal Earthquake

Three years ago, on April 25, 2015, a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal. The earthquake and aftershocks killed over 8,000 people and injured more than 21,000. Among those who mobilized staff and resources in the world’s response to this disaster were six Hilton Prize Coalition member organizations that were embedded in Nepal – BRACHumanity & Inclusion, Heifer InternationalHelpAge InternationalOperation Smile and SOS Children’s Villages.

Two years ago the Hilton Prize Coalition released the film “On Shifting Ground” to emphasize these six organizations’ collective response to disaster. Through the production of the film, the organizations involved gained greater familiarity with one another’s capacities in the region and formed a framework for collaboration.

Focused on a continuum of care for survivors of the disaster, one Hilton Prize Coalition member helped rehabilitate people who had survived injuries, some of them amputations. Ramesh Khatri was only 18 years old when Humanity & Inclusion’s Senior Physiotherapist Sunil Pokhrel began to work with him.

Ramesh recently recalled the day the earthquake claimed both his legs: “I was working in a small hotel, I had finished my day. The earth trembled, everything collapsed. Two people died where I was. I found myself crushed under the stones. I stayed there for at least an hour, conscious, in pain.”

© Elise Cartuyvels/Humanity & Inclusion

The film “On Shifting Ground” follows the rehabilitation work that Ramesh experienced through Humanity & Inclusion. During one scene, Pokhrel teaches Ramesh how to pop a wheelie on the back two tires of his wheelchair, allowing Ramesh to clear major obstacles in his path.

Since those initial wheelie lessons, Ramesh’s athletic skills have soared. “I do an hour and a half of bodybuilding every morning before school, and I swim every afternoon,” he said. “I play tennis and basketball on weekends. I was told that I didn’t know how to dance, so I trained and I won the dance competition “Differently Able Idol.” I have received 22 medals. My new goal: to participate in the Paralympic Games of 2020. But the road is long and hard: I need a coach to train me. I need equipment, and I cannot afford it.”

And seven years after dropping out of school, Ramesh has returned to the classroom. “I am the eldest of the family. The money I earn during my sporting competitions goes to my parents and my brothers and sisters, who live in difficult conditions, far from here. I went back to school because I want to have a job and get out of it.”

While physical therapy will be a lifelong journey for Ramesh, his story is a true testament to the necessity of long-term recovery plans after disaster. Humanity & Inclusion models how humanitarian organizations can best continue their work even after emergency relief efforts are over.

Each year, Ramesh gets faster and stronger, and his dreams get bigger. At this rate, nothing can stop him.

* All images © Elise Cartuyvels/Humanity & Inclusion

About The Hilton Prize Coalition

The Hilton Prize Coalition is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the Fellows Program, the Collaborative Models Program and the Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Cherry blossom branch

April Laureate Highlights

This week the Hilton Prize Coalition showcases the work of five of its outstanding Laureates. This collection of news updates and featured blogs demonstrate the depth of the organizations that make up the Coalition. The Coalition seeks to amplify its members’ impact and promote collaboration in humanitarian assistance, human rights, development, education and health.

Scenes of Healing: Vijayawada Medical Mission captures snapshots of Operation Smile’s life-changing work and those who benefit from their services. The blog shows parents anxiously awaiting their children’s cleft surgery and patients seeing their new smiles for the first time. During the week-long program in Vijayawada, India, medical volunteers provided 93 patients with free, transformitive cleft surgeries.

On April 11, Covenant House president Kevin Ryan was present at the White House for the signing of the Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act. The bipartisan bill allows human trafficking victims to bring civil action against website proprietors who knowingly facilitate criminal conduct. The stories of hundreds of young people who faced sex trafficking before coming to the Covenant House helped build a case for the passage of the bill.

In this blog, Saschveen Singh from Doctors without Borders/MSF describes a typical day of work providing healthcare to Burundian refugees in Tanzania. Each day varies from resuscitating a patient to planning for pharmacy supplies and training medical interpreters. Due to the lack of advanced tools and referral options, Saschveen has to rethink, and occasionally reinvent, the best ways to provide care to her patients.

The International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims plans to expand the use of the Anti-Torture Database. The database stores and analyzes data that can be used as evidence to advocate for the rights of torture survivors. According to Suraj Koirala, Executive Manager at Transcultural Psychosocial Organization Nepal, “The more centres that are using this Database and are collecting data in a uniform way, the stronger our collective voice becomes in the global fight against torture.”

The International Rescue Committee (IRC) highlights contributions refugees have made to society in this brief video. Inventions that were conceived by refugees have changed our everyday lives by improving technology, and the way we make doughnuts. The IRC helps people who have be devastated by conflict survive and regain control of their lives.

 

About The Hilton Prize Coalition
The Hilton Prize Coalition is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the Fellows Program, the Collaborative Models Program and the Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

HPC Fellow: Ahlam Awad Mohammed, The Task Force for Global Health

Ahlam Awad Mohammed is currently completing a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellowship with The Task Force for Global Health, an international NGO based in Decatur, GA that focuses on controlling and eliminating infectious diseases and on helping strengthen health systems around the world. Ahlam holds a Master of Public Health from the University of Texas Health Science Center in Epidemiology and Global Health and a Bachelor’s degree in Biological Sciences from Ohio Wesleyan University.

In this blog post, Ahlam writes about her experience working with the Neglected Tropical Diseases Support Center (NTD-SC)–a program of The Task Force for Global Health–observing, assisting with, and developing case studies for various NTD projects based in Ethiopia.

Joining in the Fight to Beat Neglected Tropical Diseases
by Ahlam Awad Mohammed

Sometimes things just come together.

When I applied for the Hilton Prize Coalition Fellowship through The Task Force for Global Health (TFGH), it was at a point in my career when I had decided to change gears. I had obtained my Master of Public Health degree with the goal of working in global health, specifically in infectious diseases and maternal and child health. However, most of my public health work experience prior, during, and right after graduate school focused primarily on research based in the U.S. I wanted to focus on global health again, use the skills I acquired through my professional and educational experience thus far, and leverage my language proficiency in French, English, Arabic, and Amharic to contribute to a global health cause. Imagine my delight when I found a fellowship opportunity in global health with a focus on neglected tropical diseases and in the country where I grew up: Ethiopia.

Ahlam with child

In Dedo district outside of Jimma, lab technician Biniam preparing to collect a blood spot from a young boy (Courtesy of Tensae, our team’s driver)

Incidentally, neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are are all about coming together, as well. These communicable diseases affect more than a billion people around the world, mainly in developing countries in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. That number is coming down, thanks to ongoing collaborations among international partners, including the World Health Organization (WHO), endemic countries, non-governmental organizations, pharmaceutical companies, and donors. These groups are working closely together to control, eliminate, and eradicate at least 10 of the most common NTDs on WHO’s list by 2020.

Already, countries are beginning to bid NTDs adieu. For instance, Mexico, Morocco, and Oman are a few of the countries that have achieved WHO validation for eliminating trachoma, a bacterial eye disease that is the leading cause of preventable blindness in the world. However, many other countries are still far behind their goals. Therefore, there is still a great deal of work to be done in NTDs to improve the lives of the estimated 1.4 billion people suffering worldwide.

Armed with this knowledge, I was thrilled to receive the fellowship. I was extremely excited for the opportunity and ready for the challenges that would come along. The fellowship included a few weeks of orientation, training, and meetings at the TFGH office in Decatur, Georgia, then the field work in Ethiopia. The plan was for me to follow along the Federal Ministry of Health (FMoH) of Ethiopia during the national rollout of a new rapid and inexpensive tool for supervising and monitoring coverage of preventive treatments for NTDs, called the Supervisor’s Coverage Tool (SCT) that was recently endorsed by the WHO.

I was also involved in other trachoma research studies in Ethiopia supported by the TFGH. These studies focused on 1) a four-year follow-up study on the outcomes of two different types of surgeries used in trachoma treatment in adults and 2) the evaluation of the immunological response to the trachoma-causing bacteria compared to the visual clinical manifestation of the active infection in children. For all of the studies, I was in charge of both assisting with the projects in the field and developing case studies for advocacy purposes.

Due to various reasons ranging from coordination issues to bureaucracy, budget, and political unrest in some districts, all the projects experienced significant delays, which were learning experiences in and of themselves. Indeed, despite the many delays, the overall experience and exposure was invaluable. With each delay and challenge, I learned to be more proactive, patient, and flexible–with guidance and support from my amazing TFGH mentor all along the way.

While some of our plans had to change and at times on the spot, traveling to various regions of the country for the field work not only allowed me to get first-hand account of the activities in the field, but also gave me the opportunity to collaborate with various partners involved (FMoH, International Trachoma Initiative (ITI), Berhan Public Health and Eye Care Consultancy, Orbis, The Carter Center, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), and RTI). Even after my fellowship is over, I hope to continue working with these same partners and others, to continue the fight against NTDs until they are eliminated. Together, we will beat NTDs!

Lastly, I am grateful for the Hilton Prize Coalition and The Task Force for Global Health for this opportunity and the continuous support I received from both organizations throughout the fellowship. I appreciate their involvement in helping me transition into and cultivate passion for this field, and for instilling knowledge, practice, patience, and persistence within me.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition
The Hilton Prize Coalition is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the Fellows Program, the Collaborative Models Program and the Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Children eating

Rethinking rice: how a collaborative approach to fortification can reduce malnutrition in Myanmar

This article on Philanthropy Journal was authored by Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow Catherine May at PATH.

The momentum to eradicate hunger and address all forms of malnutrition is growing across the world. Improved nutrition is a “vital precondition” to achieving 12 of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. Beyond that, the Global Nutrition Report reports that for every dollar invested in combating malnutrition, countries can expect to see a $16 return.

Nowhere was this momentum more evident to me than in the Rice Fortification Working Group (RWFG) Meeting in Naypyidaw, Myanmar. Representatives from the public, private, and international donor sectors gathered to share their hopes and concerns for the future of fortified rice in Myanmar. Working with the PATH Myanmar office, I was there to learn how a policy could best support the two goals of the project: to reduce micronutrient deficiencies across the population while creating economic opportunities for suppliers and distributers.

PATH

For the past forty years, PATH has worked across more than 70 countries to address complex problems like malnutrition. PATH strives to save lives and improve health, especially among women and children, by advancing technologies, strengthening systems and encouraging healthy behaviors. Awarded the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize in 2009, PATH’s health solutions now reach an average of 150 million people across the globe every year.

Read the full article at Philanthropy Journal

Heart shape made of people

World Health Day – Universal Health Coverage

April 7 marks World Health Day, a day that advocates for universal health care for everyone, everywhere. The World Health Organization believes that everyone has a role in achieving and maintaining universal health care. With nearly half of the population unable to obtain essential health services, there are several organizations stepping up to bridge the gap. Through conducting research, providing accessible education, or increasing access to care, members of the Hilton Prize Coalition are improving health care in the world’s most underserved communities.

Here are some examples of a few Coalition Members taking action in support of global health:

The newest member of the Hilton Prize Coalition, icddr,b, supports lifesaving research and provides care in some of the poorest areas in Bangladesh. Their high-quality laboratory facilities conduct research into diseases that affect low and middle-income countries. Icddr,b supports Matlab, the longest running demographic surveillance field site in the global South, operating since 1966. Matlab is located in an area of rural Bangladesh, where it has collected data from more than 200,000 people living in 142 villages. The data, which includes health, demographic and social characteristics, has contributed to a wide range of research that has helped shape policy and practice. Due to icddr,b research, subsequent policy changes, as well as improved childhood care and family planning, life expectancy has increased from 50 years to 65 years.

Amref Health Africa, winner of the Hilton Humanitarian Prize in 1999, contributes to universal health coverage by equipping local workers with the knowledge they need to provide care to their communities. Their approach utilizes “African solutions to tackle critical African health challenges with African expertise.” Amref Health Africa partners with other organizations to support the mobile platform Leap that trains health workers wherever they may be. Leap guides participants through an approved training curriculum through basic SMS and audio messages which allow health workers to learn on their phones. Health workers within the same area can communicate with one another via messages. The platform even stores patient health information for better monitoring and treatment. In rural African communities where Leap is used, there has been a 20% increase in people using immunization services.

One of the key programs offered by 2016 Hilton Prize Laureate the Task Force for Global Health is the Partnership for Influenza Vaccine Introduction (PIVI). The program enables seasonal influenza vaccination programs in low- and middle-income countries. Hundreds of thousands of people have died from the flu, and if influenza is untreated it may spread into a pandemic. PIVI works with countries so that if a pandemic occurs, systems will be in place to distribute vaccines and stop the infectious disease from spreading farther. Pandemic preparation allows countries to move resources quickly, protecting the global community from the spread of infectious disease.

Not all health issues are physical. According to Partners in Health, the 2005 Hilton Prize Laureate, untreated mental disorders account for 13% of the global burden of disease. By 2030, the leading cause of disability around the world will be depression. Partners in Health has made mental health a central part of their primary care package. The community-based approach was enacted in Haiti following the 2010 earthquake and has since been integrated into the primary care system in hospitals. Partners in Health continues to develop mental health programs around the world which are designed to fit the needs of the communities they serve.

About The Hilton Prize Coalition
The Hilton Prize Coalition is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the Fellows Program, the Collaborative Models Program and the Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

 

Coins

What Nonprofits Need to Know about Blockchain: Humanitarian Use Cases

This article on Philanthropy Journal was authored by Hilton Prize Coalition Fellow Desiree Dickerson at Women for Women International

Over the past year, blockchain technology has been touted as the miracle solution to all of society’s pressing ailments. From food supply chains and insurance claims, to art authentication and DNA sequencing, blockchain technology is touching almost every industry, and humanitarian and nonprofit work is no different. While blockchain technology has the potential to significantly impact these sectors and their efforts, it is not always the best fit for every organization. Nonetheless, nonprofits should fully evaluate the technology to understand if it aligns to organizational needs, and if so, determine any necessary business justification for implementation.

This article provides an introduction to blockchain, potential use cases for philanthropic work, and suggested steps for examining if it is right for your organization.

Introduction to Blockchain

In response to the 2008 financial crisis, an anonymous individual, or group of individuals, developed a technology to decentralize control and power of money, so often abused throughout the financial services industry. Many may recognize this as the advent of Bitcoin (often unfairly linked to criminal syndicates), but it was also the first mainstream recognition and acceptance of what is commonly referred to as blockchain technology…

Read the full article at Philanthropy Journal 

HelpAge and HI Launch New Inclusion Standards for Humanitarian Response

On March 15, 2018, Hilton Prize Coalition members HelpAge International in partnership with Humanity & Inclusion co-hosted an event in Washington D.C. entitled “Putting Inclusion into Practice.” The event marked the U.S. launch of the Humanitarian Inclusion Standards for Older People and People with Disabilities. The standards, which have been developed by the Age and Disability Capacity Program and funded by the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID), consist of nine key inclusion standards and seven sector-specific standards, designed to work in conjunction with the Sphere Humanitarian Standards and the Core Humanitarian Standard for Quality of Life.

During the event, attendees heard remarks from Kate Bunting, CEO of HelpAge US, Jeff Meer, U.S. Executive Director of Humanity & Inclusion, and a panel of humanitarian response experts. Each speaker discussed the importance of inclusion in their respective organizations and how they are bringing purposeful inclusion practices to not just their programs, but to their whole organization.

Each speaker echoed the same sentiment that, as we look to the future, inclusion needs to be more focused and not an added step in the process, but a key piece built into humanitarian response.

The panel consisted of experts in humanitarian response.

View and download the humanitarian inclusion standards for older people and people with disabilities.

(All photos courtesy of HelpAge International US)

About The Hilton Prize Coalition
The Hilton Prize Coalition is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the Fellows Program, the Collaborative Models Program and the Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

Marcus with Children's Village sign

HPC Fellow: Marcus Miller, SOS Children’s Villages

Marcus Miller completed a Hilton Prize Coalition Fellowship with SOS Children’s Villages, the largest nongovernmental organization dedicated to the care of orphaned and abandoned children across the globe. Marcus holds a Master’s Degree in Film & Video Studies and a Bachelor’s Degree in Media Communications from George Mason University. He also received a Technical Diploma in Web Development from General Assembly in Washington, DC. In this post, Marcus reflects on his experience as a member of the Marketing and Communications team at the SOS-USA headquarters.

My Fellowship Journey
by Marcus Miller

When I first applied for a Hilton Prize Coalition fellowship for SOS Children’s Villages I knew very little about the organization, but what intrigued me about them was the work that they do for children across the globe. I state in my portfolio that my professional mission is to produce digital content that elevates humanity and society, so two things about SOS’s fellowship description that caught my eye were the phrases “digital content” and “serving children.” After reading that I was sold. I have friends around the city from various backgrounds across the world who raved about the organization and how popular they were on a global scale. This was exciting to me because my career goals have always been based on impacting culture and society, whether through an advertising agency, media outlet, or an awesome non-profit that benefits the needs of the people.

During my journey at SOS, my main responsibility was to create and improve digital content for the end of the year fundraising efforts. The end of the year/holiday season is always the most important time to raise money because that is when the majority of donations are made. I was very excited and up for the challenge of not only putting my new coding knowledge to the test, but also having an opportunity to really help vulnerable children across the world. My duties included building web pages for sos-usa.org, creating email templates and donation forms to engage donors and non-donors, and creating video content for social media, YouTube, etc. From the get-go, the organization made me feel very comfortable, giving me the green light on creativity, engagement, and ideas to further improve digitally. I adapted so quickly that I got to a point where I felt able to handle the maintenance of the website primarily on my own.

One of my goals was to grow professionally, especially at a high profile organization. As a global non-profit, SOS definitely gave me the chance to do just that. It was so exciting to work with people overseas, knowing that everyone had the same goals in mind. I’ve conducted meetings, learned new software that I know I will need in the future, and most importantly I’ve gained experience and knowledge from a marketing standpoint. My background is based on media and technology, but being able to work with experienced professionals and learn the strategies that it takes to not only reach an audience but also to impact people was gold for me. To cap it all off, 2017 was SOS’s highest grossing year, and I am so happy to be a part of that.

Last but not least, I am grateful for the people here at SOS. I always say that your workplace is your second home and that your co-workers are your second family, and man, did the people here confirm my view. The vibe here is just so family-oriented and loving. Everyone here is about the service business and everyone being equal. They have a very diverse group of people, and the children that we do work for are very diverse as well, as SOS operates in over 135 countries. We throw so many functions/events here, including happy hours, birthday celebrations, potlucks, holiday parties, etc. Bonding and experiencing joy with my new group of co-workers made me feel like I worked there for years. For that experience I cannot thank them enough, as those memories will always live in my heart.

I call this fellowship a journey because there were so many emotions that took place during my time here. I was fortunate to experience life working in a major city such as Washington D.C. just as I’m beginning my overall career path, especially during these changing times. With the political climate and the tragedies that go on in our world each and every day, these days just feel so different and more out of whack than ever before. With that being said, I have to admit that waking up every day to focus my energy and efforts towards REAL problems going on in our world such as taking care of starving and displaced children definitely made me feel like I was doing my part to make the world a better place, and I am so grateful. There were times I would work on photographs and images of the children and I would quietly just tear up knowing that I am actively doing my part to help them, and that my help was paying off. When I think about it, at the end of the day it’s not just about yourself. It’s about us as a whole and our future generation. We are only as strong as our weakest link, and during these times if you’re not standing for something then what are you doing?

About The Hilton Prize Coalition
The Hilton Prize Coalition is an independent alliance of the 22 winners of the Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, working together to achieve collective impact. Through three signature programs—the Fellows Program, the Collaborative Models Program and the Storytelling Program—the Coalition leverages the resources, talents and expertise of each of its members to innovate and establish best practices that can be shared with the global NGO and donor communities. Working in more than 170 countries, the Coalition is governed by a board comprised of the leaders of the Prize-winning organizations led by an Executive Committee and a Secretariat, Global Impact.

To learn more about the Hilton Prize Coalition, visit prizecoalition.charity.org, or contact prizecoalition@charity.org. Follow the Hilton Prize Coalition on Twitter and LinkedIn, and “Like” us on Facebook.

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